Course:   Science                    Grade:    7            Unit:  Organisms:  The Beginning

  

Essential Questions

Academic Vocabulary

What does it mean to be living?

How are macroorganisms different than microorganisms?

How do compound microscopes work?

How do worms differ?

Can organisms regenerate?

What makes different plants differ?

How do organisms reproduce?

How do different types of cells differ from one another?

Compound microscope, field of view, eyepiece, fine adjustment knob, dry-mount, lens, diaphragm, nosepiece, objective lense, stage, arm, stage clip, coarse adjustment knob, base, light, parthenogensis, genus, species, WOWBug, Lumbriculus variegates (California blackworm), chaetae, posterior, anterior, macroorganism, microorganism, ecosystem, monocot, dicot, seed coat, endosperm, cotyledon (seed leaf), leaves, embryo, seed coat, germination, Lepidoptera, metamorphosis, excrement, arthropods, insects, egg, instar, larva, chrysalis, frass, proboscis, spermatophore, cell, organelle, chloroplast, photosynthesis, epithelial, cytoplasm, cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, Golgi body, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, nuclear envelope, nucleolus, ribosome, lysosomes, conjugation, zygospore, pyrenoids, zygote, sygospore, filament, turgor pressure, plasmolysis, dendrites, ason, cell body

Stage One:  Outcomes

Knowledge  *  Skills  *  Understandings

Grade Span Expectations

 

Big Ideas – In this introductory unit students learn to use the tools of life scientists and begin working with several organisms.

·         Understand the characteristics of organisms, listing fundamental life processes

·         Understand how and why scientists classify organisms

·         Learn how to use a compound light microscope, prepare slides, record observations

·         Develop laboratory skills including:  making observations, taking measurements, and recording data, looking for signs of changes and comparing structures of related organisms

·         Understand ecosystems and the relationship among the living things, their needs, and their environment

·         Differentiate between macro- and micro-organisms

·         List the needs of plants

·         Describe the life cycle of plants

·         Characterize plants as dicotyledons or monocotyledons

·         Classify insects

·         Learn anatomic features of an insect

·         Define “the cell” and differentiate among different kinds of cells. 

·         Label parts of cells.

·          Understand the relationship between form and function in living things

LS1 (5-6) – 2  Students demonstrate understanding of structure and function-survival requirements   by…   2a describing structures or behaviors that help organisms survive in their environment (e.g., defense, obtaining nutrients, reproduction, and eliminating waste).

LS1 (7-8) – 2 Students demonstrate understanding of structure and function-survival requirements by  2a explaining how the cell, as the basic unit of life, has the same survival needs as an organism (i.e., obtain energy, grow, eliminate waste, reproduce, provide for defense).  2b observing and describing (e.g., drawing, labeling) individual cells as seen through a microscope targeting cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, and chloroplasts.  2c observing, describing and charting the growth, motion, responses of living organisms

LS1 (5-6) –3  Students demonstrate an understanding of reproduction by … 3a defining reproduction as a process through which organisms produce offspring.  3b describing reproduction in terms of being essential for the continuation of a species.  3c investigating and comparing a variety of plant and animal life cycles.

LS1 (7-8)–3  Students demonstrate an understanding of reproduction by …  3a explaining reproduction as a fundamental process by which the new individual receives genetic information from parent(s).  3b describing forms of asexual reproduction that involve the genetic contribution of only one parent (e.g., binary fission, budding, vegetative propagation, regeneration).  3c describing sexual reproduction as a process that combines genetic material of two parents to produce a new organism (e.g., sperm/egg, pollen/ova)

LS1 (5-6) –4  Students demonstrate understanding of differentiation by…  4a identifying cells as the building blocks of organisms.

LS3 (5-6) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8a stating the value of, or reasons for, classification systems.

LS3 (7-8) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8c recognizing the classification system used in modern biology.

Stage Two:  Assessment

 

Stage Three:  Instructional Strategies

Resources

 

  • Describe and name organisms
  • Use microscopes to observe slide-mounted specimens, measure the diameter of the field of view under different magnifications, and observe WOWBugs in dry-mount slides
  • Make and record observations of WOWBugs, blackworms (particularly during regeneration),
  • Measure and record the average pulse rate of a blackworm
  • Construct a pond and observe and document the layers of the pond and the living things in the pond
  • Observe changes that occur in the pond model over time
  • Examine the role of water and minerals in the growth and development of plants
  • Grow Wisconsin Fast Plants in order to document the life cycle of these plants
  • Document the germination and development of corn and lima bean seeds and observe the similarities and differences between these seeds and plants
  • Measure the length of an egg and a body of a cabbage white butterfly larva over time.
  • Determine food preferences of cabbage whites
  • Investigate the anatomy of an adult cabbage white
  • Observe and record characteristics of cells and identify certain organelles of plant and animal cells
  • Observe the effect of salt solution on Elodea leaf cells
  • Compare the structure of various cells

 

Standard laboratory equipment including microscopes equipped with digital cameras

 

Organisms-From Macro to Micro - Kit 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Course:   Science                    Grade:    7           Unit:  Organisms:  Continuing the Cycle

 

Essential Questions

Academic Vocabulary

How do cells divide?

How do flowering plants reproduce?

How do plants obtain energy?

What impact have microbes made on human history?

How do biologists classify microorganisms?

How do ponds change over time?

Cell division, chromosomes, interphase, cell division, cytokinesis, mitosis, centromere, microtubules, chromatid, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, ATP, DNA, centromere, diploid, haploid, micropyle, meiosis, pollen, sperm, ovule, synerids, antipodal nuclei, plar nuclei, pollination, endosperm, fruit, xylem, transpiration, photosynthesis, guard cells, stomata, palisade cells, spongy layer, mesophyll, protists, amoeboids, pseudopodia, cilia, Flagellates, ciliates, flagella, amoeboids, vacuoles, endoplasm, ectoplasm, ciliates, contractile vacuole, vesicles, flagellates, monerans,

Stage One:  Outcomes

Knowledge  *  Skills  *  Understandings

Grade Span Expectations

 

Big Ideas – Students make observations and conduct investigations with organisms first introduced in unit 1.

·          Describe the steps of cell division, demonstrating understanding of mitosis, cytokinesis, and interphase and their roles in animal and plant cells

·          Depict the behavior of chromosomes during these phases

·          Describe features of flowers and the role of these features.

·          Explain reproduction in flowering plants.

·          Demonstrate an understanding of the difference between cell division and meiosis

·          Understand the movement of water in plants including the role of transpiration, osmosis, stomata, and guard cells; and the relationship between the number of leaves and the amount of water passing through the plant

·          Describe photosynthesis

·          Explain how the structure of a dicot leaf helps control the water flow in a plant

·          Differentiate among animal-like and plant-like characteristics of microorganisms

·          Understand the importance of microorganisms in history

·          Observe, identify, and draw microorganisms found in ponds and differentiate between biotic and abiotic things found in ponds

·          Explain succession and find and describe evidence of succession in a pond 

LS1 (5-6) – 2  Students demonstrate understanding of structure and function-survival requirements   by…   2a describing structures or behaviors that help organisms survive in their environment (e.g., defense, obtaining nutrients, reproduction, and eliminating waste).

LS1 (7-8) – 2 Students demonstrate understanding of structure and function-survival requirements by  2a explaining how the cell, as the basic unit of life, has the same survival needs as an organism (i.e., obtain energy, grow, eliminate waste, reproduce, provide for defense).  2b observing and describing (e.g., drawing, labeling) individual cells as seen through a microscope targeting cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, and chloroplasts.  2c observing, describing and charting the growth, motion, responses of living organisms

LS1 (5-6) –3  Students demonstrate an understanding of reproduction by … 3a defining reproduction as a process through which organisms produce offspring.  3b describing reproduction in terms of being essential for the continuation of a species.  3c investigating and comparing a variety of plant and animal life cycles.

LS1 (7-8)–3  Students demonstrate an understanding of reproduction by …  3a explaining reproduction as a fundamental process by which the new individual receives genetic information from parent(s).  3b describing forms of asexual reproduction that involve the genetic contribution of only one parent (e.g., binary fission, budding, vegetative propagation, regeneration).  3c describing sexual reproduction as a process that combines genetic material of two parents to produce a new organism (e.g., sperm/egg, pollen/ova)

LS1 (5-6) –4  Students demonstrate understanding of differentiation by…  4a identifying cells as the building blocks of organisms.

LS2  (5-6) –6  Students demonstrate an understanding of energy flow in an ecosystem by …  6a identifying the sun as the major source of energy for life on earth and sequencing the energy flow in an ecosystem.

6b. describing the basic processes and recognizing the substances involved in photosynthesis and respiration.

LS3 (5-6) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8a stating the value of, or reasons for, classification systems.

LS3 (7-8) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8c recognizing the classification system used in modern biology.

Stage Two:  Assessment

 

Stage Three:  Instructional Strategies

Resources

 

·         Simulate interphase

·         Examine and compare different flowers

·         Cross-pollinate Wsiconsin Fast Plants

·         Compare cell division and meiosis

·         Conduct investigations with plants growing in a growing system

·         Explore transpiration and photosynthesis

·         Use models to understand how the structure of cells and plant parts operate

·         Observe and draw a stomatal unit

·         Observe protists and identify animal-like and plant-like characteristics

·         Read about the importance of microorganisms in history

·         Make observations of student-made ponds, sketching and labeling the biotic and abiotic contents and looking for evidence of succession

 

Standard laboratory equipment including microscopes equipped with digital cameras

 

Organisms-From Macro to Micro - Kit

 

Print sources include:  Prentice Hall, Parade of Life:  Monerans, Protists, Fungi and Plants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Course:   Science                Grade:    7            Unit:  Organisms:  Completing the Cycle

 

Essential Questions

Academic Vocabulary

How are fungi harmful or beneficial to humans?

How does the heart rate of Daphnia vary when its body is subjected to certain chemicals?

How do Hydra capture food, move about, and respond to stimuli?

How are the life cycles of Wisconsin Fast Plants and cabbage white butterflies related?

How can you predict the characteristics of offspring of Wisconsin Fast Plants and humans?

How and why are the characteristics of offspring related to those of the parents?

Theory of Evolution, natural selection, mutation, genetic drift, allele, mimicry, camouflage, disguise, habitat, form and function, mold, fungi, saprobes, parasites, mutualistic symbionts, chitin, filamentous fungus, hyphae, mycelium, septa, rhizoids, stolons, sporangiophore, sporangia, pileus, basidia, basidiospores, yeast, fermentation, ascospores, budding, daphnia, crustacean, exoskeleton, gill, antennae, appendage, carapace, summer eggs, winter eggs, setae, naupliar eye, biramous, open circulatory system, hydra, budding, sting cells (matocyst), tentacles, achenes, heredity, genetics, Mendelian geneticsmeiosis, homologs, diploid, haploid, centromere, chromatid, tetrad, prophase, metaphase, telophase, Punnett square, genetic cross, allele, genotype, homozygous, heterozygous, phenotype,

Stage One:  Outcomes

Knowledge  *  Skills  *  Understandings

Grade Span Expectations

 

Big Ideas – Several experiments, begun in unit I, can now be investigated.  In addition, students research a vertebrate and create and use a dichotomous key to show understanding of several concepts developed throughout the unit

·          Understand the relationship between form and function by describing the structure and purpose of a vertebrate’s body parts.

·          Understand the role of adaption for the survival of organisms

·          Understand the biotic and abiotic features of an organism’s habitat that influence its ability to survive.

·          Describe evolution, read about the rapid evolution of Daphnia, and determine whether this evidence supports Charles Darwin’s ideas.

·          Describe the characteristics of fungi, types of fungi (including mold and yeast) and conditions ideal for the development of these organisms.

·          Explain the benefits to humans of different types of fungi

·          Investigate and understand the response of an organism to various stimuli

·          Observe, record, and measure organisms (including Hydra), labeling prominent features and describing methods of obtaining food and reproducing

·          Explain the reproductive cycle of a plant, recognizing the pod as a fruit, and a fruit as a package for seeds.

·          Compare the life cycles of a plant with that of an insect

·          Gain an introductory understanding of genetics and the how a Punnett square is used to determine phenotypic and genotypic ratios for potential offsprings and how these ratios can be used to determine the genotypes of parents

·          Demonstrate an understanding of homozygous and heterozygous gene pairs

·          Develop written dichotomous keys and understand how to use such keys to identify organisms

 

LS1 (5-6) – 2  Students demonstrate understanding of structure and function-survival requirements   by…   2a describing structures or behaviors that help organisms survive in their environment (e.g., defense, obtaining nutrients, reproduction, and eliminating waste).

LS1 (7-8) – 2 Students demonstrate understanding of structure and function-survival requirements by  2a explaining how the cell, as the basic unit of life, has the same survival needs as an organism (i.e., obtain energy, grow, eliminate waste, reproduce, provide for defense).  2b observing and describing (e.g., drawing, labeling) individual cells as seen through a microscope targeting cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, and chloroplasts.  2c observing, describing and charting the growth, motion, responses of living organisms

LS1 (5-6) –3  Students demonstrate an understanding of reproduction by … 3a defining reproduction as a process through which organisms produce offspring.  3b describing reproduction in terms of being essential for the continuation of a species.  3c investigating and comparing a variety of plant and animal life cycles.

LS1 (7-8)–3  Students demonstrate an understanding of reproduction by …  3a explaining reproduction as a fundamental process by which the new individual receives genetic information from parent(s).  3b describing forms of asexual reproduction that involve the genetic contribution of only one parent (e.g., binary fission, budding, vegetative propagation, regeneration).  3c describing sexual reproduction as a process that combines genetic material of two parents to produce a new organism (e.g., sperm/egg, pollen/ova)

LS1 (5-6) –4  Students demonstrate understanding of differentiation by…  4a identifying cells as the building blocks of organisms.

LS2  (5-6) –6  Students demonstrate an understanding of energy flow in an ecosystem by …  6a identifying the sun as the major source of energy for life on earth and sequencing the energy flow in an ecosystem.

6b. describing the basic processes and recognizing the substances involved in photosynthesis and respiration.

LS3 (5-6) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8a stating the value of, or reasons for, classification systems. 8b following a taxonomic key to identify a given organism (e.g. flowering and non-flowering plants).

LS3 (7-8) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8c recognizing the classification system used in modern biology. LS3 (7-8) – 8  Students demonstrate an understanding of classification of organisms by …  8a sorting organisms with similar characteristics into groups based on internal and external structures. 8b explaining how species with similar evolutionary histories/characteristics are classified more closely together with some organisms than others (e.g., a fish and human have more common with each other than a fish and jelly fish)  8c recognizing the classification system used in modern biology.

LS3 (5-6) -9  Students demonstrate an understanding of Natural Selection/evolution by …  9a explaining how a population’s or species’ traits affect their ability to survive over time.  9b researching or reporting on possible causes for the extinction of an animal or plant.  9c explaining how fossil evidence can be used to understand the history of life on Earth.

LS3 (7-8) -9 Students demonstrate an understanding of Natural Selection/ evolution by   9a explaining that genetic variations/traits of organisms are passed on through reproduction and random genetic changes. 9b gathering evidence that demonstrates evolutionary relationships among organisms (e.g., similarities in body structure, early development, traits).  9c differentiating between acquired and inherited characteristics and giving examples of each.  9d explaining how natural selection leads to evolution (e.g., survival of the fittest).  9e describing how scientists’ understanding of the way species originate or become extinct has changed over time.

LS4 (5-6)-11  Students demonstrate an understanding of human heredity by …  11a differentiating between inherited and acquired traits.  11b observing, recording and comparing differences in inherited traits (e.g. connected earlobe, tongue rolling).

LS4 (7-8)-11  Students demonstrate an understanding of human heredity by …  11a recognizing that characteristics of an organism result from inherited traits of one or more genes from the parents and others result from interactions with the environment.   11b tracing a genetic characteristic through a given pedigree (e.g., genealogical chart, Queen Victoria – hemophilia or hypothetical example) to demonstrate the passage of traits.  11c identifying that genetic material (i.e. chromosomes and genes) is located in the cell’s nucleus.

Stage Two:  Assessment

Stage Three:  Instructional Strategies

Resources

 

  • Anchor Activity:  Create a poster report on an assigned animal.
  • Give an oral presentation on an assigned animal.
  • Create and use dichotomous keys

·         View video:  Body by Design:  Form and Function

·         Student chooses a vertebrate to research (body structures and influence on function and habitat).

·         Read about and discuss the theory of evolution.

·         Discuss evidence for the theory of evolution

·         Design and conduct experiments with mold formation.

·         Design and conduct experiments with yeast.

·         Observe, sketch, and measure a Daphnia, identifying its major structures

·         Determine the heart rate of Daphnia under various conditions

·         Observe, sketch, and measure a Hydra, labeling its prominent features

·         Observe a Hydra’s methods of obtaining food, reacting to touch, and asexual reproduction

·         Harvest Wisconsin Fast Plants and set up seeds for germination

·         Predict the characteristics of offspring

·         Discuss the relationship between the life cycles of Wisconsin Fast Plants and cabbage white butterflies

·         Make observations of Wisconsin Fast Plants to discern inherited traits

·         Demonstrate how certain genes interact in pairs to express dominant or recessive traits

·         Discover by experimentation how Gregor Mendel established the fundamentals of heredity

·         Participate in a simulation of meiosis and fertilization

·         Use Punnett squares to show how genes pair during a genetic cross

·         Develop written dichotomous keys and create a graphical dichotomous key for 13 organisms. 

 

Standard laboratory equipment including microscopes equipped with digital cameras

 

Print sources include:  Prentice Hall, Evolution:  Change in Species Over Time

 

Organisms-From Macro to Micro - Kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Course:   Science                    Grade:    7            Unit:  The Sun, Earth, Moon System

 

Essential Questions

Academic Vocabulary

How have people’s ideas about Earth evolved through history?

Why does the Moon appear to change shape?

What determines the length of a year?

What causes day and night, seasons, eclipses, and lunar phases?

Geocentric, heliocentric, lunar phase, lunar eclipse (total, partial, penumbral), seasons, solar eclipse (total, partial, annular), solar system, tide, comet, galaxy, Milky Way, astronomical unit, scale, relative size, Sun, Moon, Earth, solar energy, orbit, rotation, revolution, angular diameter, shadow, winter, spring, summer, fall, counterclockwise, clockwise, perspective, [plane of the] ecliptic, horizon, angular separation, solar noon, axis, Polaris, North Star, sunrise, sunset, latitude, longitude, degree, precesses, precession, Southern Hemisphere, Northern Hemisphere, waxing, wanting, sidereal month, synodic month, full moon, half moon, crescent, first quarter, third quarter, sextant, zenith, umbra, penumbra, shadow cone, syzygy, nodes, radiant energy, radiation, conduction, convection, radiometer, sunspot, space weather,

Stage One:  Outcomes

Knowledge  *  Skills  *  Understandings

Grade Span Expectations

 

Knowledge

  • List the names of the moon phases

·         Know that space weather is the result of solar disturbances such as sunspots, which affect people and equipment in space and on Earth

 

Skills

·         Make comparisons between objects based on apparent and true diameters

·         Use a shadow stick to reveal relationships between time of day and the apparent position of the Sun

·         Use models to examine ideas about the Earth-Moon-Sun system

·         Apply mathematics to compare the relative distances between two objects based on their apparent and true diameters

·         Record Moon rise and set over a one- to two-week period.

 

Understandings

·         Understand how people’s ideas about Earth as a planet have evolved through history

·         Through discussion, identify common misconceptions about astronomy

·         Use simple models to demonstrate an understanding of Moon phases, eclipses, and seasons

·         Understand how the Earth’s rotation causes the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky and that different latitudes will have different sunrise and sunset times during the year

·         Explain how shadows change according to the time of day and the time of year

·         Understand that seasons are caused by the unique relationship between the Sun and the Earth in terms of how the Earth travels around the Sun

·         Understand that the Moon goes through a predictable cycle of changes in its apparent shaped called phases and that from any place on Earth, where the Moon is visible, the phase of the Moon is the same on any given day

·         Describe the Moon and how it reflects light from the sun.  Explain that the Moon’s phases occur because we see only portions of the Moon’s illuminated side, depending on the Moon’s position relative to Earth

·         Understand the cause of an eclipse and the alignment of the Sun, Earth and Moon in relation to the plane of the ecliptic

·         Describe the location of the planetary body within the shadow cone and how this determines the type of eclipse (lunar or solar)

·         Understand that solar radiation, the energy from the sun, is a major source of energy on Earth

·         Understand how Earth and its atmosphere absorb and reflect the Sun’s radiant energy; in turn, the absorbed energy heats the planet and its atmosphere.

 

ESS2 (5-6)-6 Students demonstrate an understanding of characteristics of the solar system by …  6a identifying and comparing the size, location, distances, and movement (e.g. orbit of planets, path of meteors) of the objects in our solar system.  

ESS2 (7-8) -7 Students demonstrate an understanding of how technological advances have allowed scientists to re-evaluate or extend existing ideas about the solar system by…  7a identifying major discoveries from different scientists and cultures and describing how these discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the solar system (e.g. timeline, research project, picture book).

ESS2 (5-6)-8   Students demonstrate an understanding of temporal or positional relationships between or among the Earth, sun, and moon by …  8a using models to describe the relative motion/position of the Earth, sun and moon.   8b explaining night/day, seasons, year, and tides as a result of the regular and predictable motion of the Earth, sun, and moon.  8c using a model of the Earth, sun and moon to recreate the phases of the moon.

ESS2 (7-8) -8 Students demonstrate an understanding of temporal or positional relationships between or among the Earth, sun, and moon by …8a using or creating a model of the Earth, sun and moon system to show rotation and revolution.  8b explaining night/day, seasons, year, and tides as a result of the regular and predictable motion of the Earth, sun, and moon.  8c using a model of the Earth, sun and moon to recreate the phases of the moon.

Stage Two:  Assessment

Stage Three:  Instructional Strategies

Resources

·         Sun-Earth-Moon performance task:  conduct an investigation designed to demonstrate the sun’s impact as an energy source

·         Sun-Earth-Moon written assessment provided in STC kit

·         Preassess student understanding of the solar system and Earth in space.

·         Use models to demonstrate understanding

·         Use sizes and distances to create a scale model of the Sun-Earth-Moon system.

·         Record the Sun’s changing position in the sky throughout the day using a shadow stick.

·         Use a flashlight to model winter and summer shadows

·         Use a light source and globe to analyze the effects of Earth’s rotation

·         Use models, readings, and computer programs to investigate seasonal variations at different latitudes.  For example, use the computer program, Starry Night Backyard to investigate changes in sunrise and sunset data at different latitudes throughout the year.

·         Use both observational data and models (such as black and white styrene sphere) to illustrate the phases of the Moon.

·         Investigate the geometry of eclipses through models, videos, and computer programs.

·         In a laboratory setting, investigate the effects of distance on the amount of energy received from a light source.

·         Use a radiometer to observe the effects of the Sun’s radiant energy.

·         Read about sunspots and space weather.  Track sunspots by using projection through binoculars.  Use a computer program to observe sunspots and track long-term sunspot data.

Earth in Space Kit

Starrry Night Backyard computer program

Flashlights, other light sources, globes

 

 

 

 

 

  


Course:   Science                    Grade:    7            Unit:  The Solar System

 

Essential Questions

Academic Vocabulary

 What have we gained from space exploration?

Should we go back to the Moon?

What would the Earth be like without the Moon?

Satellite, astronaut, payload, Hubble Space telescope, planet, probe, mission, gravity, sidereal day, moon, satellite, scale model, solar system, astronomical unit (AU), scale factor, asteroid, asteroid belt, terrestrial planets, gaseous planets, nuclear fusion, craters, impact, rays, dependent variable, controlled variable, independent variable, erosion, weathering, regolith, humus, plate tectonics, volcanism, maria, stream table, gravitation, mass, weight, inertia, force, orbital motion, orbital velocity, orbital period (period of revolution), law of universal gravitation, law of inertia (Newton’s first law), acceleration, velocity, scientific law, tides, low tide, high tide, tidal cycle, semidiurnal tides, diurnal tides, solar tide, spring tide, neap tide

Stage One:  Outcomes

Knowledge  *  Skills  *  Understandings

Grade Span Expectations

 

Knowledge

·         List and describe planetary processes including wind erosion, water erosion, plate tectonics, volcanisms and impact craters and relate these processes occurring on asteroids and planets to those occurring on Earth

 

Skills

·         Use planetary data to compare planets with one another

 

Understandings

·         Understand how science and technology have advanced through the contributions of many different people at different times in history

·         Understand how science influences society through its knowledge and world view

·         Understand how mathematical models of the solar system can be created from a set of scaled items, which are used to explore the relative diameters of and distances between the planets and the sun

·         Understand the cause of impact craters and where these craters can be found

·         Relate the size, velocity and shape of objects striking a planet’s surface to the formation of craters on that surface

·         Explain gravitation as a force that attracts objects to each other and depends on the mass and radius of a planet. 

·         Understand the difference between mass and weight

·         Explain the role of gravity with respect to the orbit of planets around the sun and all motion in the solar system

·         Explain  how unbalanced forces can change the speed and/or direction of a object’s motion

·         Understand the cause of tides 

ESS2 (5-6)-6 Students demonstrate an understanding of characteristics of the solar system by …  6a identifying and comparing the size, location, distances, and movement (e.g. orbit of planets, path of meteors) of the objects in our solar system.   6b comparing the composition, atmosphere, and surface features of objects in our solar system.

ESS2 (7-8) -7 Students demonstrate an understanding of how technological advances have allowed scientists to re-evaluate or extend existing ideas about the solar system by…  7a identifying major discoveries from different scientists and cultures and describing how these discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the solar system (e.g. timeline, research project, picture book).

ESS2 (5-6)-8   Students demonstrate an understanding of temporal or positional relationships between or among the Earth, sun, and moon by …  8a using models to describe the relative motion/position of the Earth, sun and moon.   8b explaining night/day, seasons, year, and tides as a result of the regular and predictable motion of the Earth, sun, and moon.  8c using a model of the Earth, sun and moon to recreate the phases of the moon.

ESS2 (5-6) -8  Students demonstrate an understanding of gravitational relationships between or among objects of the solar system by …8d defining the Earth’s gravity as a force that pulls any object on or near the Earth toward its center without touching it.

ESS2 (7-8) -8 Students demonstrate an understanding of temporal or positional relationships between or among the Earth, sun, and moon by …8a using or creating a model of the Earth, sun and moon system to show rotation and revolution.  8b explaining night/day, seasons, year, and tides as a result of the regular and predictable motion of the Earth, sun, and moon.  8c using a model of the Earth, sun and moon to recreate the phases of the moon.

ESS2 (7-8) -8 Students demonstrate an understanding of gravitational relationships between or among objects of the solar system by…  8d describing the relationship between mass and the gravitational force between objects.  8e describing the  relationship between distance and the gravitational force between objects.   8f explaining that the sun’s gravitational pull holds the Earth and other planets in their orbits, just as the planet’s gravitational pull keeps their moons in orbit.

ESS3 (5-6)–9 Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by … 9a describing the apparent motion/position of the objects in the sky. (e.g. constellations, planets).  9b identifying the sun as a medium-sized star located near the edge of a disk-shaped galaxy of stars.

ESS3 (7-8)-9Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by… 9a describing the universe as containing many billions of galaxies, and each galaxy contains many billions of stars.

 ESS3 (5-6)–9 Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by …   9a describing the apparent motion/position of the objects in the sky. (e.g. constellations, planets).  9b identifying the sun as a medium-sized star located near the edge of a disk-shaped galaxy of stars.

ESS3 (7-8)-9Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by  9a describing the universe as containing many billions of galaxies, and each galaxy contains many billions of stars.

 

Stage Two:  Assessment

 

Stage Three:  Instructional Strategies

 

Resources

·         Create a planetary travel brochure and share this information with the class.

·         Design a future space mission to the designated planet.

·         Calculate scaled sizes and distances.

 

·         Read about the history of the space program and about discoveries made during Apollo exploration of the moon.

·         Research a space mission and report out to the class.

·         Share what they know about relative order of, size of, and distances between the planets.

·         Create a scale model of the solar system.

·         Classify planets, moons, and asteroids on the basis of surface features and compare features of one planet to another.

·         Model the effects of impact cratering.  Design experiments to investigate impact cratering.

·         Investigate ways that surface features of the Earth and other planetary bodies have formed.

·         Investigate the difference between weight and mass and take measurements of these quantitites. 

·         Complete investigations to understand how the motion of an object is affected by forces.

·         Analyze patterns in planetary motion.

·         Graph and analyze the times and heights of tides, moonrise and moonset times, and phases of the moon in order to draw conclusions about the cause of tides.

 

Earth in Space Kit 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


Course:   Science         Grade:    7          Unit:  Earth’s History as a Planet

    

Essential Questions

Academic Vocabulary

Reflectivity, spectroscopy, comets nucleus, sublimate, coma, head, tail, long-period comets, short-period comets, Oort cloud, meteoroid, meteor, meteorite, meteor shower, fossil, trace fossil, mummification, mold, cast, strata, spinoff,

Stage One:  Outcomes

Knowledge  *  Skills  *  Understandings

Grade Span Expectations

 

Knowledge

  • Describe smaller objects found in the solar system, including asteroids, meteoroids and comets
  • Describe Earth’s experiences with occasional catastrophes, such as asteroid impact, which can change or destroy human and wildlife habitats or upset the balance of the Earth

 

Skills

 

 

Understandings

  • Understand that fossils represent the remains of once living organisms and provide important evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed on Earth over time
  • Describe similarities and differences among Earth and the other planets; and explain how these characteristics  allow us to hypothesize about how life on Earth might be affected if conditions changed
  • Understand how the different climates on Earth support different animals, plants, and microorganisms and that climate changes can also cause extinctions of a species
  • Explain how science and technology have advanced through the contributions of manned and unmanned space programs and explain that “Spinoff” products are those products initially designed for the space program but have been adapted for use on Earth

ESS2 (5-6)-6 Students demonstrate an understanding of characteristics of the solar system by …  6a identifying and comparing the size, location, distances, and movement (e.g. orbit of planets, path of meteors) of the objects in our solar system.   6b comparing the composition, atmosphere, and surface features of objects in our solar system.

ESS2 (7-8) -7 Students demonstrate an understanding of how technological advances have allowed scientists to re-evaluate or extend existing ideas about the solar system by…  7a identifying major discoveries from different scientists and cultures and describing how these discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the solar system (e.g. timeline, research project, picture book).

ESS2 (5-6)-8   Students demonstrate an understanding of temporal or positional relationships between or among the Earth, sun, and moon by …  8a using models to describe the relative motion/position of the Earth, sun and moon.   8b explaining night/day, seasons, year, and tides as a result of the regular and predictable motion of the Earth, sun, and moon.  8c using a model of the Earth, sun and moon to recreate the phases of the moon.

ESS2 (5-6) -8  Students demonstrate an understanding of gravitational relationships between or among objects of the solar system by …8d defining the Earth’s gravity as a force that pulls any object on or near the Earth toward its center without touching it.

ESS2 (7-8) -8 Students demonstrate an understanding of temporal or positional relationships between or among the Earth, sun, and moon by …8a using or creating a model of the Earth, sun and moon system to show rotation and revolution.  8b explaining night/day, seasons, year, and tides as a result of the regular and predictable motion of the Earth, sun, and moon.  8c using a model of the Earth, sun and moon to recreate the phases of the moon.

ESS2 (7-8) -8 Students demonstrate an understanding of gravitational relationships between or among objects of the solar system by…  8d describing the relationship between mass and the gravitational force between objects.  8e describing the  relationship between distance and the gravitational force between objects.   8f explaining that the sun’s gravitational pull holds the Earth and other planets in their orbits, just as the planet’s gravitational pull keeps their moons in orbit.

ESS3 (5-6)–9 Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by … 9a describing the apparent motion/position of the objects in the sky. (e.g. constellations, planets).  9b identifying the sun as a medium-sized star located near the edge of a disk-shaped galaxy of stars.

ESS3 (7-8)-9Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by… 9a describing the universe as containing many billions of galaxies, and each galaxy contains many billions of stars.

 ESS3 (5-6)–9 Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by …   9a describing the apparent motion/position of the objects in the sky. (e.g. constellations, planets).  9b identifying the sun as a medium-sized star located near the edge of a disk-shaped galaxy of stars.

ESS3 (7-8)-9Students demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the universe by  9a describing the universe as containing many billions of galaxies, and each galaxy contains many billions of stars.

 

Stage Two:  Assessment

Stage Three:  Instructional Strategies

Resources

·         Space technology and research poster

·         Solar system assessment (lesson 22), including performance task

·         Use mathematical patterns to analyze the position of the asteroid belt.

·         Analyze the ability of scientists to forecast asteroid and comet impact.

·         Watch a video about the relationships among fossils, dinosaur extinction, and asteroid impact

·         Excavate a rock that contains fossils

·         Examine the relative ages of fossils

·         Model molds and casts

·         Compare Earth to other planets in the solar system

·         Explore the effects of climate change on Earth

·         Read about products that have spunoff from the space program and research one such product.

 

Earth in Space Kit 

 

 

 

 

 

                        For the Year at a Glance View, click here.

To return to the Narragansett science curriculum website, click here.