NARRAGANSETT

HIGH SCHOOL

 

NARRAGANSETT, RHODE ISLAND

 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

2002 - 2003

 

Revised January, 2002

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

                        Mr. Stephen Coppinger................................... Principal

Mr. John Kennedy........................................... Associate Principal

                        Mr. Daniel Warner.......................................... Associate Principal

 

 

 

GUIDANCE PERSONNEL

 

                        Mrs. Sandi O’Brien......................................... Counselor/Department Chairperson

                        Mr. Robert Shuman......................................... Counselor

                        Mr.  Raymond Xavier...................................... Counselor

 

 

 

NARRAGANSETT HIGH SCHOOL TELEPHONE NUMBERS

 

                        Main Office..................................................... 792-9400

                        Guidance Office............................................... 792-9406

                        FAX............................................................... 792-9410

                        TT/Voice Relay............................................... 1-800-RI55555

 

 

 

 

MISSION OF NARRAGANSETT PUBLIC SCHOOLS

The mission of the Narragansett School System is to

prepare all students to be “self-directed learners, responsible persons, and effective communicators while developing as individuals,

critical thinkers, and knowledgeable students”

who appreciate diversity in a global society.

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

                                              FOREWORD.....................................................................................1

                   STATEMENT OF PURPOSE.....................................................................................2

                   GENERAL INFORMATION.....................................................................................4

PROGRAM PLANNING INFORMATION.................................................................................6

         RECOMMENDED STUDY PLANS....................................................................................8

                              SPECIAL PROGRAMS.................................................................................13

                               COURSE OFFERINGS.................................................................................18

 

                                                                                  Art………………………………………….19

                                                       Business Education………………………………………….20

                                                     Computer Education………………………………………….21

                                                                           English………………………………………….23

                                                         Foreign Language………………………………………….29

                   Technology Education…………………..………………………30

                                                            Human Services………………………………………….32

                                                                 Mathematics………………………………………….34

                                                Media/Communications……………………………….…………39

                                                                             Music………………………………………….40

                                            Physical Education/Health………………………………………….42

                                                                           Science…………………………………………43

                                                                 Social Studies…………………………………………48

                        Special Services………………..……………………………54

                                                                     INDEX…………….……………..………………...57

 


FOREWORD

 

 

 

 

Dear Parents and Students:

 

        The Narragansett High School Program of Studies Handbook has been prepared to assist you in planning your present and future educational program.  A study of the contents will reveal the academic strength of the curriculum as well as the diversity of curricular offerings.  Many options have been outlined as recommended programs of study for those who either wish to pursue higher education or employment. 

 

        The faculty and staff of Narragansett High School are prepared to help you make the most of your opportunities.  While parents and pupils always have the final responsibility for selection of the program of study, teacher and guidance counselor recommendations are an integral part of the selection process.  As you plan your educational program, consider your future objectives, interests, and needs.  If you are undecided, keep your options open.

 

        Please accept our personal best wishes for a rewarding, involved, and successful school year.

 

                                                Sincerely,

 

 

                                                Stephen Coppinger, Principal

 

 

                                                John Kennedy, Associate Principal

 

 

                                        Daniel Warner, Associate Principal

 


STATEMENT of PURPOSE

 

 

Narragansett High School promotes and provides educational opportunities for all of its students. In partnership with parents and the community, the staff encourages students to prepare themselves for the world of work and advanced studies.  The community expects students to develop and acquire skills, knowledge, and values, allowing them to contribute as American citizens in a global society.

 

Our school is devoted to developing responsible self directed learners.  This school challenges its students to improve in all the comprehensive areas of knowledge and personal development.

 

Narragansett High School is a community of learners.  We explore, apply, and promote appropriate changes in educational techniques and technologies.  Our community reflects a diverse society.  We encourage individuality, respect differences, and strive to eliminate prejudice in both attitude and action.

 

-- EXPECTATIONS --

 

            For Student Performance ...  Students shall:

·        develop as individuals

·        apply critical thinking skills

·        exhibit responsible behavior

·        learn to use their minds well

·        become self directed learners

·        practice effective communication

·        master essential skills in all areas

·        develop a competent knowledge base

·        practice good health and fitness skills

·        demonstrate their knowledge in a variety of ways

·        show trust, decency, courtesy, and respect for all persons

·        demonstrate practical knowledge of available technologies

 

            For School Performance ... School shall:

·        explore grouping strategies

·        promote student demonstration projects

·        explore and refine curriculum integration

·        review and implement scheduling options

·        promote the behavior of “student as worker”

·        integrate skill development into the curriculum

·        utilize cooperative learning strategies when feasible

·        model trust, decency, courtesy, and respect for all persons

·        master and apply technology when appropriate and productive

·        utilize a shared-decision making process whenever appropriate

·        develop student content and performance standards for each course and graduation

·        implement policies that ensure a physically clean, healthy, and safe environment that

is free from any form of  harassment


ADDENDUM TO STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

·        Goals are statements of the aims or ends of specific content areas.  An example of this in Social Studies would be the development of competent and responsible American citizens.

 

·        Standards are statements specifying what students should know and be able to do.  The Standards of every course are found in the curriculum guides.  Standards are of two types:  content and performance.

 

            *  Content standards are statements of what students should know and be able to do in a specific                   discipline. Intellectual and participatory skills are the two main components of content                            standards.

*  Intellectual and critical thinking skills are described in curriculum guides with these          words:              identify, describe, explain, evaluate a position, take and defend a position,          investigate,        innovate, connect, determine, select, and adopt solutions that are suitable to the problem.

*  Participatory skills are skills that allow the student to successfully participate in the course   content.  Examples of this in English and Social Studies would be to observe governmental agencies at work, present positions to student councils, compose letters to the editor, advocate positions at  at a public meeting, participate in a play, speech, or recital, etc.

*  Performance standards are criteria for determining students’ level of achievement of the      content standards in each discipline.

 

·        Student-as-worker is the governing practical metaphor of the Coalition of Essential Schools 5th Principle (out of 10).  Student-as-worker refers to the issue of student academic responsibility.  “It promotes the idea of student-as-worker versus the more familiar metaphor of teacher-as-deliverer-of-instructional-services.  Teachers will promote the technique of teaching students to learn how to learn and thus to teach themselves.”

 

·        Cooperative learning strategies implement group work and teams within the classroom in order to attack and solve specific problems.  Cooperative, competitive, and individualistic learning are three learning strategies that can be successfully used by a teacher to assist students in their learning and developing skills.

 

·        Curriculum integration is the cooperation between academic disciplines to promote interdisciplinary learning and associations.  An example would be that the English and World History teachers cooperate in covering similar topics at the same time -- Renaissance literature is read and discussed at the same time the historical issues are being discovered and explored.

 

·        Grouping is the way in which you organize students to learn.  Grouping occurs in four different ways:  heterogeneous (students of different ability levels in the same class); homogeneous (students of the same ability level in the same class); cooperative learning groups (students assisting one another in the learning and research process); teaming (students are on a team to complete a specific project or an entire subject).

 

·        Demonstration Projects are alternative strategies for the evaluation of student achievement.  An example of this in Social Studies would be, after thorough research, participation in a formal debate on the relevance of the two party system in America.  Demonstration projects are alternatives to, and supplement, tests.

 

·        Shared Decision Making is a decision making model that has the groups most impacted by a decision involved in making the decision.


GENERAL INFORMATION

 

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

 

Minimum Credit Requirements

 

To earn a diploma from Narragansett High School students must accumulate a minimum of 22 credits of which 2 must be in PE/Health.  In addition to physical education/health, students must carry a minimum of 2-1/2 credits each semester. The following credit totals are necessary for advancement into the following grades:

 

Sophomore standing:                              5.5

Junior standing:                                     11.0

Senior standing:                                    16.5

 

 

                                                        Course Requirements

                                             English                                          4

                                             Mathematics                                3

                                             Science                                        2

                                             Social Studies                               2      (1 must be U.S. History)

                                             Foreign Language                         2      (college-bound students only)

                                             Art/Music                                    1/2

                                             Computer Science                        1/2

                                             Physical Education/Health             2

                                             Electives                                      6-8

 

In order to graduate from Narragansett High School a student must have attended Narragansett High School for at least a full semester immediately prior to graduation.  Additionally, all students must pass at least 4 credits plus P.E./Health in the senior year in order to graduate.  The transcripts of students who transfer from another school will be reviewed to determine if any modifications in either course or credit requirements are warranted.  Under extenuating circumstances, the credit requirement for physical education/health may be waived for medical reasons.

 

 NEW STUDENT INFORMATION

 

Students new to Narragansett High School must be accompanied by a parent or guardian for registration at the Guidance Office.  When parents come to the school to register a student, they should bring documentation of date of birth, proof of residency, medical records, and a current report card and transcript.  The Guidance Office and Main Office are open throughout the school year and during the summer.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

 

Narragansett High School participates in the College Entrance Examination Board's Advanced Placement Program.  Qualified students, with department approval and within scheduling limitations, may enroll in the following courses:

 

·        Advanced Placement Calculus (AB Level)

·        Advanced Placement English

·        Advanced Placement Physics

·        Advanced Placement Psychology

·        Advanced Placement United States History

 

In May of each year, National Standardized Examinations are given in each course.  Fees (payable by the student) for these tests are set by the CEEB.  Colleges may, according to their individual policies, award credit, advanced placement standing, or both for the achievement of specified scores on these examinations.  Students may take these examinations without having taken the particular course.  Details are available in the Guidance Office.

 

REPEAT COURSES

 

A repeat course is one that the student takes after having previously failed.  A student who passes a repeat course will have both the "F" and the repeat grade computed in the Grade Point Average (GPA).  A student who fails a required course and who does not attend summer school will normally be expected to make up this course during the following academic year.

 

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY

 

Level 1:            These are advanced placement or accelerated courses containing highly challenging material.

 

Level 2:            These are college preparatory courses presenting material designed to challenge students with a wide range of abilities and interests.

 

Level 3:            These courses are general in nature with material which is designed to develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of a subject and to improve basic skills.

 


PROGRAM PLANNING INFORMATION

 

COURSE SELECTION PROCEDURES

 

 

PREPARING YOUR PROGRAM

 

1.      A course selection form with teacher recommendations will be mailed home by February 1st.

2.      Students should read the course descriptions carefully, and consider teacher recommendations.  If students want to take a course for which they have not been recommended, a parent/guardian must notify the guidance department within two weeks of the student’s intent to waiver.  Students will then be asked to complete the waiver process  (See below).

3.      Students indicate on the form those electives they wish to select for the upcoming school year.

4.      Counselors will meet with students to verify course selections and enter schedules into the computer.

 

 

WAIVER PROCESS

 

Placement in Level 1, 2, or 3 classes is determined by recommendation of the previous teacher and the academic department.  Students who are dissatisfied with the teacher recommendation may request a waiver.

 

To begin the waiver process, students should have a parent call the guidance office to request a waiver meeting that will include the student, parent(s)/guardian, the guidance department chairperson and the academic department chairperson.  The rationale for the proposed change and the course requirements will be discussed.  Requests for changes in level will not be considered without this conference.  All appointments will be held in March.

 

 

HONORING COURSE SELECTIONS

 

Course selection is one of the most important responsibilities that students have each year at the High School.  Students should discuss their choices with their counselor, teachers and parents.  Once students choose their program, every effort will be made to meet their needs.  Teaching personnel, rooms, textbooks, and materials are all planned with students’ selections in mind.  Based on the courses that the students and parents have requested, a master schedule is compiled which attempts to accommodate the course selections requested.  In some cases students may have scheduling conflicts, which will have to be resolved with their counselor through the selection of alternate courses.  If a student selects a course that is canceled, he/she will be asked to make an alternate selection.  Students and parents should plan to make adjustments in course selections prior to the end of the current school year.

 

 

 

 

COURSE CHANGES

 

Careful thought must be given to each course selection.  Discuss your choices with your counselor, teachers and parents.  Do not register for classes with the idea that changes will be made if things do not work out.  A decision to elect a course is much like a contract which must be honored and not broken.  All changes in a student's schedule will be made in accordance with the following guidelines and restrictions:

 

1.      Student schedules will be distributed by April vacation to give students the opportunity to make changes or correct scheduling errors before the close of school.

 

2.      All course changes are subject to the availability of space in the requested course.

 

3.      In the case of extenuating circumstances, if students are carrying more than the minimum number of subjects, students may elect to drop a course after the drop/add period has ended. If a marking period has ended, the student’s grade will be noted on the permanent transcript for that marking period, and a (W) will be noted for the subsequent marking period and semester.  Students may not add a course after the drop/add period has ended, and will be placed in a study hall for the first semester.  Students should then choose an elective to replace the study hall in the second semester.


RECOMMENDED STUDY PLANS

 

 

 

 

CAREER/COLLEGE RESOURCE CENTER

 

A Career/College Resource Center assists students in developing career plans and post-high school educational needs to fulfill those career goals.  Materials on careers, colleges, armed services, and technical schools are in the center for student use.  EXPAN is a computerized information system, providing information on occupations, 2 and 4-year colleges, graduate schools, vocational schools, armed service occupations, and sources of financial aid.  It also offers a Majors and Careers File, State vocational school files and Career Decision-Making Interest Inventory.  EXPAN is available on all computers in the Library/Media Center and the IBM lab.  A great deal of information and resources, including a data base of appropriate sites, are also available on the world wide web (Internet).

 

 

 

TYPICAL COURSE PATTERNS

 

In an effort to assist students and parents regarding selection of courses, the following patterns of study are presented.  Each pattern of study represents a direction that others have successfully followed in choosing a course of study toward some career goal.  You are an individual.  Your needs may be similar to others but rarely will they be identical.  We strongly urge you to seek the advice of your Guidance Counselor and teachers as you plan the program that most closely reflects and is consistent with your future plans.

 

Choose the courses that will develop your abilities and attitudes in many fields.  The broader your program, the more college and career possibilities will be open for you.  Don't taper off during your last year or two.  Coasting in your junior and senior year tends to soften you at the precise moment when you should be strongest and most ready for the challenges of meeting college entrance requirements or preparing to enter the world of work.


 

FRESHMEN COURSE OFFERINGS

POST HIGH SCHOOL PLAN

 

Specialty School,

Apprenticeship, Military

Two Year

School

Typical College

4-year Program

Highly

Competitive

College

ENGLISH

English 9

College & Career

Communications I

English 9

College & Career

Communications I

English 9

College & Career

Communications I

English 9 (Acc)

MATH

Math 9

IMP I

Algebra I

IMP I

Algebra I

IMP I

Algebra II (Acc)

IMP I

SCIENCE

Greenhouse

Earth Science

Earth Science

Earth Science

Earth Science

SOCIAL STUDIES

Government/

Applied Economics

Government/

Applied Economics

Government/

Applied Economics

Government/

Applied Economics (Acc)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

Elective*

 

Elective*

French

Italian

Spanish

French

Italian

Spanish

P.E./HEALTH

X

X

X

X

ELECTIVE

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

 

            * May be Foreign Language if Language Arts is on grade level.

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to the courses listed above, the following courses are available to freshmen:

 

FRESHMEN ELECTIVES

 


ART

Art I & II

Basic Photography

 

BUSINESS

Introduction to Financial Services

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Computer Applications

Computer Hardware, Operating Systems and Networks

Elem. Computer Programming


 

 

ENGLISH

Introduction to Theater

Theater

 

HUMAN SCIENCE

& SERVICE

Basic Foods

Basic Sewing


MUSIC

Concert Band

Honors Band

Chorus

Guitar I

Guitar II

Music Appreciation

Music Theory

Piano I

Piano II

 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Technology I

Drafting I


                                                       SOPHOMORE COURSE OFFERINGS                      

 

                                             POST HIGH SCHOOL PLAN

 

Specialty School, Apprenticeship, Military

Two Year

School

Typical College

4-year Program

Highly

Competitive

College

ENGLISH

English 10

College & Career

Communications II

English 10

College & Career

Communications II

English 10

College & Career

Communications II

English 10 (Acc)

MATH

Algebra I

IMP II

Algebra I

IMP II

Geometry

IMP II

Geometry (Acc)

IMP II

SCIENCE

Horticulture I

Biology I

Biology I

Biology I

Biology I (Acc)

SOCIAL STUDIES

World History

World History

World History

World History (Acc)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

Elective*

 

Elective*

French

Italian

Spanish

French

Italian

Spanish

P.E./HEALTH

X

X

X

X

ELECTIVE

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

 

*May be Foreign Language if Language Arts is on grade level.

 

    In addition to the courses listed above, the following courses are available to sophomores:

 

SOPHOMORE ELECTIVES


ART

Art I & II

Basic Photography

Ceramics I & II

 

BUSINESS

Introduction to Financial Services

Accounting

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Computer Applications

Computer Hardware, Operating

Systems and Networks

Elem. Computer Programming

CISCO I & II

 

ENGLISH

Introduction to Theater

Theater

 

 

 

 

 HUMAN SCIENCE

& SERVICE

Child Development I

Child Development II

Basic Foods

Advanced Foods

Basic Sewing

 

MEDIA/
COMMUNICATIONS

Film Appreciation

Mass Media

Radio/Video Production

 

SCIENCE

Horticulture I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MUSIC

Concert Band

Honors Band

Chorus

Guitar I & II

Music Appreciation

Music Theory

Piano I & II

 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Technology I & II

Drafting I

Machine Parts Drafting

Architectural Drafting

 


                                                            JUNIOR COURSE OFFERINGS

 

POST HIGH SCHOOL PLAN

 

Specialty School, Apprenticeship, Military

Two Year

School

Typical College

4-year Program

Highly

Competitive

College

ENGLISH

English 11

College & Career Communications III

English 11

College & Career Communications III

Rhetoric I

American Lit.

College & Career Communications III

English 11 (Acc)

MATH

Algebra I

IMP III

Algebra I

Algebra II

IMP III

 

Algebra II

IMP III

 

Trigonometry/

Analytic Geometry (Acc)

IMP III

SCIENCE

Horticulture II

Biology I

 

Horticulture II

Biology I

 

Chemistry I

 

Chemistry I (Acc)

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

U.S. History

U.S. History

U.S. History

AP U.S. History

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

 

Elective*

 

Elective*

French

Italian

Spanish

French

Italian

Spanish

P.E./HEALTH

X

X

X

X

ELECTIVE

2 Electives

2 Electives

Elective

Elective

            * May be Foreign Language if Language Arts is on grade level.

 

In addition to the courses listed above, the following courses are available to Juniors:

 

JUNIOR ELECTIVES

ART

Art I & II

Basic Photography

Ceramics I & II

 

BUSINESS

Personal Finance

Accounting

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Computer Applications

Computer Hardware, Operating

Systems and Networks

Elem. Computer Programming

CISCO I, II, III, & IV

 

MEDIA/COMMUNICATIONS

Mass Media

Radio/Video Production

Adv. Video Production

Film Appreciation

 

ENGLISH

Introduction to Theater

Theater

 

HUMAN SCIENCE &SERVICE

Child Development I & II

Independent Living

Basic Foods

Advanced Foods

Basic Sewing

Sports Nutrition

 

MUSIC

Concert Band

Honors Band

Chorus

Guitar I & II

Music Appreciation

Music Theory

Piano I & II

 

SCIENCE

Ecology

Environmental Science

Horticulture I & II

Biology II

Biology II Accelerated

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

U.S. & the World

Contemporary Issues

Sociology, Socialization & Psych.

Social & Abnormal Psychology

Criminal Justice

Youth & the Law

Ethics

Comparative World Religions

 

 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Machine Parts Drafting

Architectural Drafting

Technology II

Architectual Design

Construction

Land Surveying I & II

 


SENIOR COURSE OFFERINGS

 

POST HIGH SCHOOL PLAN

 

Specialty School, Apprenticeship, Military

Two Year

School

Typical College

4-year Program

Highly Competitive College

ENGLISH

English 12

 

College & Career Comm. III or IV

English 12

 

College & Career Comm. III or IV

Rhetoric II

Contemporary Lit.

Fantasy Lit.

College & Career Comm. III or IV

AP English

College Writing

World Literature

MATH

IMP IV

IMP IV

Trigonometry/

Analytic Geometry

IMP IV

AP Calculus

IMP IV

SCIENCE

Tech Prep II

Elective

Tech Prep II

Elective

Physics

Physics (Acc)

AP Physics

SOCIAL STUDIES

Social Studies

Elective

Social Studies

Elective

Social Studies

Elective

Social Studies

Elective

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

Elective*

 

Elective*

French

Italian

Spanish

French

Italian

Spanish

P.E./HEALTH

X

X

X

X

ELECTIVE

2 Electives

2 Electives

2 Electives

 Elective

            *May be Foreign Language if Language Arts is on grade level.

 

        In addition to the courses listed above, the following courses are available to seniors:

SENIOR ELECTIVES

ART

Art I & II

Basic Photography

Ceramics I & II

 

BUSINESS

Accounting

Personal Finance

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Computer Applications

Computer Hardware, Operating Systems and Networks

Elem Computer Programming

CISCO I, II, III, & IV

 

ENGLISH

Introduction to Theater

Theater

Sports Literature

 

MEDIA/

COMMUNICATIONS

Mass Media

Radio/Video Production

Adv. Video Production

Film Appreciation

HUMAN SCIENCE & SERVICE

Child Development I & II

Independent Living

Basic Foods

Advanced Foods

Basic Sewing

Sports Nutrition

 

TECHNOLOGY ED.

Machine Parts Drafting

Architectural Drafting

Technology II

Architectual Design

Construction

Land Surveying I & II

 

SCIENCE

Biology I & II

Chemistry  I & II

Horticulture I, II, & III

Ecology

Environmental Science

 

 

 

MATHEMATICS

Intro.  to Calculus I & II

Probability & Statistics

College Math

 

MUSIC

Concert Band

Honors Band

Chorus

Guitar I & II

Music Appreciation

Music Theory

Piano I & II

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

U.S. & the World

Contemporary Issues

Soc, Socialization & Psych.

Social & Abnormal Psych.

Criminal Justice

Youth & the Law

AP Psychology

Ethics

Comparative World Religions


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

 

INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM

 

The Independent Study Program (ISP) is an attempt to nurture independent thinking, creativity and self-direction.  Independent study allows students to develop individual interests and talents or pursue an area of interest in greater depth.  Independent study allows students to work independently under the direction of a teacher-consultant on a subject of interest that is not covered in the regular curriculum.  Independent study may not be used to satisfy formal course requirements or graduation requirements.

 

Students should begin by investigating an area of interest and determining its feasibility as a subject for Independent Study.  A faculty member should be sought as an advisor.  Teachers involved in the program will serve as guides and resources for the student, but will not assume responsibility for the project.

 

After conferring with the assigned guidance counselor and electing to undertake the program, the student is responsible for the selection of a topic for study, establishing goals and outcomes of the study, and selecting the appropriate methods and media.  ISP forms may be obtained from the guidance counselor.

 

A student who elects the ISP must ask a teacher in the subject matter field to act as the sponsor and to review a completed ISP form.  The teacher will then submit the form to the department chair, guidance counselor and principal, who will judge the project and approve or disapprove of it with recommendations that could make an unacceptable project suitable for resubmission.  Once the project is accepted, the student establishes a working relationship and deadlines with the sponsor.  Sponsors will be limited to no more than five students per semester.

 

To be considered for first semester approval, projects must be submitted by June 3, 2002.  To be considered for second semester approval, projects must be submitted by December 12, 2002.

 

Students are encouraged and are free to work on their ISP as their daily schedule permits - before or after school, weekends, or possibly during a study period.  For this reason, ISP's will not appear on a student's schedule.

 

ISP must be selected in addition to the five and one-half credit student requirement.  This study is not a substitute for a specific subject matter offering.  The student is encouraged to use previous study or interest as a foundation for the ISP.  Not more than one credit can be earned by a student during any academic year.   The student may choose a semester project (1/2 credit) or a year-long project (1 credit).  The student may undertake two consecutive semester projects.  When a student successfully completes the ISP, his/her transcript will signify that an ISP was undertaken, the area in which it was pursued, a grade of Passing (P), and the credit earned.  After the student has completed the ISP, the sponsor will submit an evaluation form to the guidance counselor.


AUDIT COURSES

 

An audit course is one that a student has taken previously and for which he/she has received credit. When the student completes the audit course, no credit is given and the grade is not computed in the GPA.  If a student chooses to re-take a course that he/she passed in order to understand the material better, the original grade and credit will still stand.  Students who are auditing a course are still required to be enrolled in a minimum of two and one-half (2-1/2) credits (in addition to Physical Education) each semester in addition to the audited course.  They are also required to attend all classes, complete homework assignments, and take tests.

 

 

COLLEGE COURSES

 

A student may, upon approval of the guidance counselor and Principal, take one course carrying college credit during a semester or summer session and receive one-half credit for each three credit course.  All college level course work will be noted on the student's permanent record.  The results of this course will not be included in calculation of GPA unless the college course was used to remediate a previous failing grade in that particular course.  A college course used to remediate a previous failing grade in that course will procedurally qualify as a "repeat course."

 

 

EARLY ADMISSION TO COLLEGE

 

Students admitted to college before completing the requirements for graduation may receive a diploma on presentation of the official college transcript indicating successful completion of the credits necessary to meet our requirements.  A written parental request must be obtained for all students under the age of eighteen.

 

 

EARLY GRADUATION

 

It is possible for seniors to fulfill graduation requirements by January and leave school following completion of the first semester of the senior year.  These students are eligible for senior awards, including election to the National Honor Society.  These students will receive their diploma in June. It must be understood, however, that as graduates, formal participation in all school activities terminates upon January graduation.  Those students who wish to participate in other school activities must carry a full load of classes during the second semester.

 

At the request of a student and parent, the four year requirement for graduation may be waived.  Students who complete the requirements for graduation in less than four years may receive a diploma at the next scheduled graduation ceremony.  A written parental request must be obtained for all students under the age of eighteen.


COLLEGE ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

 

Students should be aware that most minimum admissions requirements include:

 

            English......................................................................... 4 credits

            Mathematics................................................................ 3 credits

                 (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II)

            Social Studies.............................................................. 2 credits

                 (U.S. History)

            Science....................................................................... 2 credits

                 (Biology, Chemistry)

Foreign Language.............................................................. 2 credits   (of 1 language)

 

Admission requirements to selective, highly competitive colleges include:

 

            English......................................................................... 4 credits

            Mathematics................................................................ 4 credits

                    (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II,

                     Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry, AP Calculus)

            Science....................................................................... 3 - 4 credits

                    (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, (Accelerated))

            Foreign Language........................................................ 3 - 4 credits  (of 1 language)

            Social Studies.............................................................. 2 - 3 credits

                    (U.S. History)

 

In both instances, further study in the above areas is recommended.  Additional courses in Art, Music, Humanities, Computer Science, etc. are suggested in order to complete a well-rounded program.

 

 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT

 

Concurrent enrollment is an alternative program for the superior senior student, enabling him/her to enroll in a post-secondary school after the junior year, while obtaining credit toward graduation here.  In other words, a student’s last semester or year of high school and first semester or year of college occur simultaneously.  The student graduates at NHS in June with his/her class.  The student must meet the requirements and the time limits specified for concurrent enrollment in order for the application to be considered.  Information may be obtained in the guidance department.

 

 

WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM

 

In order to ease the transition from school to work, the work experience program is offered to approximately 20 juniors and seniors who are 16 years of  age.  If room is available, other students who are 16 years of age will be considered for the program.  Students in this program attend classes and are supervised in a work setting (job), for which up to 2.0 school credits are earned for the entire year's work.


CHARIHO VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL EDUCATION

 

Students interested in preparing for a particular career may enroll in the Chariho Career & Technical Center.

 

Students will be accepted to the Career & Technical Center based on career objectives, record of achievement, and a good citizenship and attendance record as well as the recommendation of the Narragansett High School Principal.

 

The aim of the Career & Technical Center programs is to prepare students for entry into one of the career fields listed below either directly from high school or after additional studies at the collegiate level.  Forty to forty-five percent of the Career & Technical Center graduates pursue further study after graduation.  An equal number are prepared for and enter their careers upon graduation.  Many graduates do both – they work in their chosen field while pursuing college degrees.

 

Students may prepare for careers in:

 

                  Cosmetology                                      Small Engine Technology

                  Carpentry                                           Electronics (Computer Technology)

                  Drafting and Design                          Computer Information Systems

                  Automotive Repair                            Culinary Arts

                  Marine Occupations                          Health Occupations

                  Travel & Tourism                              Finance

 

Most programs are three year programs with students entering in the 10th grade.  The Health Occupations program is a two year program beginning in the junior year.  Highly motivated ninth grade students who have repeated a grade in the past may be considered for enrollment in an accelerated program that allows them to finish high school in three years.

 

Students successfully completing both their career and technical and academic programs will become Chariho graduates.  Students completing the Cosmetology and Health Occupations programs and successfully completing the licensing exams will be licensed cosmetologists and certified nursing assistants respectively.  Several other programs provide nationally recognized certifications upon graduation.  The Career & Technical Center has articulation programs with area post secondary institutions which provide up to a full semester of advanced standing and/or college credits for successful completion of the Center’s programs.

 

If you are interested, contact your guidance counselor for an application form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAM

 

The Service Learning Program (SLP) is an attempt to nurture self-esteem and community service.  It offers students opportunities to build character, trust, and leadership by exposing them to a variety of situations outside of the classroom.  Personalized relationships with administrators, faculty and staff, who supervise the students throughout the service learning experience, are developed and enhanced.  Students participating in the program also gain different perspectives of their school culture.  This is healthy and contributes to a strong sense of pride and respect for the school community.

 

Student assistance allows students to provide support to administration, department chairpersons, offices, the media center, science labs, special education and physical education during their study periods for either a semester or a year.  The student can also provide services in the community with faculty monitoring.  The SLP carries .25 credit per semester and must be selected in addition to the five and one-half credit student requirement.  The SLP is not intended to take the place of a high school course and, therefore, may not be used to satisfy formal course requirements.  Credit can count as an elective credit for graduation.

 

Students who select the SAP must ask an administrator, department chairperson, or teacher to act as a sponsor and to review the Program Job Description and complete and sign a SAP contract after parental permission is obtained.  The sponsor will submit the SAP contract to the Principal for approval.  Documentation of participation in the program will be included in the student transcript.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE:  EXCEPTIONS TO ANY OF THE PROCEDURES IN THE PREVIOUS PAGES MUST BE SUBMITTED IN WRITING TO THE PRINCIPAL FOR APPROVAL.


COURSE OFFERINGS

 

 

Students at Narragansett High School may select courses according to levels of difficulty (see page 5) as well as interest.  Narragansett High School weights its grade point average according to levels of difficulty.  The following is a course listing by subject area with the appropriate level of difficulty. 

 

Also, please note:  Courses labeled as “Full Year” are 1 Credit courses.  Students will earn 1/2 Credit for each semester passed in a “Full Year” course. 

 


                                                          ART

 

114  ART I                                                                                                                          1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

Explore the world of art through research on master and modern artists and cultural art and the use of a variety of materials and techniques.  Some mediums used throughout the semester include graphite, pen and ink, pastels, collage, watercolors, tempera and acrylic paints.

 

 

115  ART II                                                                                                                        1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Art I Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

For students wishing to further develop and fine-tune their skills in drawing, design and composition.  Color theory, various painting mediums, printmaking and sculpture are explored.  Research and short reports on master and modern artists are also required.

 

 

120  BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                                         1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Art I             Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

Learn how to design successful photographs through study of professional photographers and by taking and analyzing your own photos.  Mounting photos for presentation is done for every lesson.  Cameras, films, composition, subjects, backgrounds, lighting and vocabulary are covered.  Student MUST have a working 35 MM SLR (Single Lens Reflex) camera and expect to shoot and develop approximately 1 roll of film per week.  There is a $75 materials fee.

 

 

125  CERAMICS I                                                                                                             1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Art I                                                                                                              Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Students are introduced to designing, building and glazing works made of clay.  Pinch, coil and slab building are used to create original pots, bowls, goblets, vases, wind chimes, picture frames and sculptures.  Students will record the processes they used for construction and glazing, and analyze the results to further develop ideas for new works.

 

 

 

 

 

 

130  CERAMICS II                                                                                                           1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Ceramics I                                                                                                    Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Having successfully completed Ceramics I, students may select to extend their skills in Ceramics II. Techniques of throwing on the potter's wheel and sculpture in clay are the foundation of this course. Assignments include investigations of expressionism, "pop" art and contemporary craftspeople.  Written components are an integral part of evaluation, as are evidence and application of understanding as exemplified in artwork.

 

 

                                       BUSINESS EDUCATION

 

210  INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL SERVICES                                                      1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-10

 

This one-year course is designed to introduce students to the various sectors of the financial services industry.  The objective of this course is to help students learn about both the nature of the careers found in a particular sector and the scope of the work that comprises businesses such as insurance, real estate, public finance, accounting and the securities industry. 

 

220  ACCOUNTING                                                                                                             1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

The complete accounting cycle is covered for a sole proprietorship service business, a merchandising partnership, and a corporation (introduction).  The students learn banking procedures, tax preparation, and payroll accounting.  The students master the preparation of Work Sheets, Income Statements and Balance Sheets.  They learn to make entries in five different journals.  They also learn to adjust, close, and correct entries.  Accounting is "The Language of Business."  This course prepares the student for future business study.

 

230  PERSONAL FINANCE                                                                                             1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This course is designed to give students a current perspective on making wise financial decisions.  The roles of citizen, student, family member, consumer and employee in personal financial management will be covered from viewpoints of business, economics and law.  Students are challenged  through a variety of real-life problems and learning activities such as the Stock Market Game.  A unit on Financial Planning is done in conjunction with the College of Financial Planning, Denver, Colorado, which sponsors a high school program used nationwide.  A certificate is awarded to each student after completion of the unit.

 

Among topics covered are money management, investment, taxes, career opportunities, etc.  The intent is to inform students of their various economic and financial responsibilities and to provide opportunities for self-awareness, expression, and advancement in a progressive and highly competitive society.  Money Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and other financial publications will be used in addition to the text.  Students taking this course will be prepared to face the challenging world of money management with confidence. 

 

Students are involved in the statewide competition of the Stock Market Game in which they gain experience in individual investing.  Guest speakers and visits to corporations provide a real-life example of information learned through the textbook.

 

 

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION

 

200  COMPUTER APPLICATIONS                                                                                1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This course builds upon basic computer applications skills.  Students will enhance their knowledge of Microsoft applications through word processing (Word), spreadsheets (Excel), databases (Access), and presentations (PowerPoint).  Projects will consist of intermediate to advanced Word including proper formatting of research/term papers; Excel spreadsheets including functions/formulas and charts; Access databases including the creation of tables, queries and reports; PowerPoint presentations, including design and implementation.

 

206  COMPUTER HARDWARE, OPERATING SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS         ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This course follows the A+ certification curriculum and covers the concepts of computer hardware, operating systems and computer networks.  Topics include computer workstation hardware configuration and assembly, Operating System installation and setup, basic networking and communication, information management, and protection and security. 

 

644  ELEMENTARY COMPUTER PROGRAMMING                                                1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of "C" in Algebra I.                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

In this course students will develop basic programming skills using pascal and C++.  Emphasis is on learning proper syntax and developing simple programs that incorporate if/then statements, loops, sorts, arrays, stacks and subroutines.  Students are expected to work independently. 

 

 

 

 

201  cISCO i                                                                                                                        ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

            Pre-requisite: Computer Hardware Operating Systems and Networks                            Level 2

                                   and/or teacher recommendation.                                                   Grades 10-12

 

The Cisco Networking Academy Program is a complete, four-semester program on the principles and practice of designing, building, and maintaining networks capable of supporting national and global organizations. The Networking Academy Program is localized to individual needs of high schools and colleges, and features hands-on, project-driven training in high-demand job skills.

 

CISCO I will provide the student with a thorough understanding of how basic networking components work in a practical hands-on environment utilizing state-of-the-art telecommunications equipment.  In this course the student will develop an understanding of the concept of networking and allow the student to demonstrate an understanding of the OSI model and the seven network layers.

 

For more information go to: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779/edu/academy/

 

 

202  cISCO II                                                                                                                      ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

            Pre-requisite: Cisco I                                                                                                     Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

CISCO II will explore the structure of a TCP/IP Internet working, including subnets, hosts, IP addressing and subnet masks and routers.  This course will focus on networking terminology and protocols, networking standards, LAN, WAN, OSI modules, Ethernet, Token ring, FDDI, TCP/IP addressing protocol, dynamic routing and the network administrator’s role and function.

 

 

203  CISCO III                                                                                                                     ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

            Pre-requisite:  Cisco II                                                                                                   Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

CISCO III will cover configurations necessary to control Novell IPX traffic in a LAN.  The class covers LAN segmentation using bridges, LAN segmentation using routers and LAN segmentation using switches.  The class also explores switchgear and router IP access list configurations, spanning tree protocol and virtual LANs.

 

 

204  CISCO IV                                                                                                                     ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

            Pre-requisite:  Cisco III                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

CISCO IV covers the configurations necessary for WAN creation and management.  The class differentiates between the following WAN services:  LAPB, Frame Relay, ISDN/LAPD, HDLC, PPP, and DDR.  Students learn to recognize key Frame Relay terms and features and list commands to configure Frame Relay LMIs, maps, and subinterfaces.  The class identifies PPP operations to encapsulate WAN data on Cisco routers.  It also identifies ISDN protocols, function groups, reference points, and channels.

 

 

ENGLISH

 

310  ENGLISH 9 – LEVEL 3                                                                                               1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                            `                                    Level 3

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

Students in this course are developing their skills in language, writing and thinking, speaking and listening, and vocabulary.  Developing good study skills as well as research skills will also be worked on.  The literary genres studied are the short story, epic poem, and the Shakespearean drama.  Novels are studied through in-class reading assignments.  The elements of fiction as employed in the short story must be mastered.  Students must also master a three-paragraph essay which employs various sentence structures and methods of supporting evidence.

 

 

311  ENGLISH 9 – LEVEL 2                                                                                               1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

Students in this course work to improve solid skills in language, writing and thinking, speaking and listening, to expand vocabulary, and to refine research and study skills.  The literary genres studied are the short story, epic poem, and the Shakespearean drama.  Novels are studied through outside reading assignments.  The elements of fiction as employed in the short story must be mastered.  Students must also master a five-paragraph essay, which employs various sentence and methods of supporting evidence.

 

 

315  ENGLISH 9 ACCELERATED                                                                                    1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 1

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

Students in this course possess strong skills in language, writing and thinking, speaking and listening, vocabulary development, and research that will be further developed through both independent and guided assignments.  They demonstrate strong study habits and enjoy independent work.  The literary genres studied are the short story, epic poem, and the Shakespearean drama.  Novels are studied both in class and as outside reading assignments.  The elements of fiction as employed in the short story must be mastered.  Students must also master a five-paragraph essay, which employs various sentence structures and methods of supporting evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

320 ENGLISH 10 – LEVEL 3                                                                                              1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                              Grade 10

 

Students in this course work to improve the writing skills developed in grade 9.  Through the study of literature and film, students work on the higher level thinking skills.  The ability to write a clear, well-supported essay based on literature is a course objective.  Opportunities for personal writing such as journaling are also provided.  Vocabulary, conventions, and sentence structure are studied to encourage sentence variety and a personal writing style.  The literary genre explored in depth is the novel.  Students continue their study of Shakespeare and other authors of note such as Steinbeck, or Hemingway.  Again, the elements of fiction are emphasized in literary analysis.  Other areas studied include speaking and active listening, critical review of media, and expansion of research and study skills.

 

321  ENGLISH 10 – LEVEL 2                                                                                             1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 10

 

Students in this course refine writing skills learned in grade 9.  The application of higher-level thinking skills is expected in all areas of study is expected.  The ability to write a clear, well-supported multi-paragraph essay based on literature is a course objective.  Conventions, usage, vocabulary, and sentence structure will be studied to enhance sentence variety and a personal writing style.  The literary genre explored in depth is the novel.  Students continue their study of Shakespeare and other authors of note such as Steinbeck or Hemingway.  Again, the elements of fiction are emphasized in literary analysis.  Other areas studied include speaking and active listening, critical review of media, and expansion of research and study skills.

 

325  ENGLISH 10 ACCELERATED/HUMANITIES                                                        1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B+” in English 9 Accelerated,                                      Level 1

                                     Government 9 Accelerated and teacher recommendation.                    Grade 10

 

This course combines English 10 Accelerated and World History Accelerated.  The teachers collaborate by integrating major cultural and historical themes and eras.  All facets of the English and History curriculum are studied.  This course emphasizes western civilization, but does not ignore Asian civilizations.  Strong emphasis is placed on independent and group investigation, presentation, and performance in speech and writing.  Students need to be very responsible and motivated learners.

 

330  ENGLISH 11                                                                                                                 1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                              Grade 11

 

This year long course is designed to meet the needs of the student who is still refining basic skills.  During the year the students explore a variety of themes in American literature.  In addition they work on various types of writing and prepare projects with an oral component.

 

331  RHETORIC I                                                                                                             1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 11

 

During this course, students further refine their writing and speaking skills.  In addition to the personal narrative, students research topics of their own choosing to produce expository and persuasive papers. Use of the MLA format is introduced.  In conjunction with these types of writing, students present informative and persuasive speeches.  Students learn to criticize others' writing and speaking and to accept criticism about theirs.

 

 

333  SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE                                                             1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 11

 

American Literature is a survey course that focuses on two essential questions:  What is an American?  What are the unique concepts/characteristics of American Literature?  While the material is organized chronologically, students are asked to identify important concepts and characteristics of each time period. 

 

 

335  ENGLISH 11 ACCELERATED                                                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B” in English 10 Accelerated                                       Level 1

                                      and teacher recommendation.                                                            Grade 11

 

English 11 Accelerated is a rigorous course which only the most able and motivated English student should consider.  Much is expected and much is demanded in this course.  Each quarter a different topic is explored.  Topics include an intensive study of rhetoric, the novel, poetry, and drama.  Literature study centers on the American experience. 

 

 

340  ENGLISH 12                                                                                                                 1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students interested in pursuing employment after high school.  The course, therefore, attempts to prepare students for the world of work by incorporating letter writing, resume preparation and interview techniques.  At the same time the students continue to refine basic areas of language (i.e., grammar, usage, spelling, vocabulary), writing, reading, study skills and research skills.  Placement is made by the English Department.  Interested students may speak with their grade 11 English teacher or the Chairperson of the department to express interest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

341  RHETORIC II                                                                                                           1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

This course builds on the writing skills taught in Rhetoric I.  The focus is research-based writing using the MLA format.  Students explore topics of their choosing and practice different organizational patterns while further developing their research skills.  Interviews and surveys as sources of information are explored.  The value of both individual and cooperative work is stressed.

 

342  FANTASY LITERATURE                                                                                        1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

This course includes readings from many types of fantasy literature including science fiction and suspense.  The students explore many authors’ views of man’s  condition and possibilities in fantastic settings. 

 

343  CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE                                                                        1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Popular and noteworthy pieces of literature dealing with a variety of themes are the core of this course.  Students may have some choice in the selection of books.  Class discussion is stressed as well as written evaluations.  Films are used to further explore a particular theme or to compare/contrast a piece of literature with its film counterpart. 

 

345  ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH                                                                     1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B” in English 11 Accelerated                                       Level 1

                                      and teacher recommendation.                                                            Grade 12

 

This course combines the Research Paper and Advanced Placement English courses into a one year course.  The process of research will be mastered and applied in a research paper which will deal with the literature studied.  The literature explored will be the classics of western literature.  All genre will be analyzed in depth. The  intensive pace and difficulty combine to prepare interested, able students to take the Advanced Placement English Test.  The results of this test may earn college credit or exemption for students.

 

346  SURVEY OF WORLD LITERATURE                                                                    1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B” in English 11 Accelerated                                       Level 1

                                      or “A-” in Rhetoric I and teacher recommendation.                             Grade 12

 

This course includes translations of important masterpieces from several ages and cultures.  All literary genre are included and studied in depth. 

 

347  COLLEGE WRITING                                                                                               1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B” in English 11 Accelerated                                       Level 1

                                      or “A-” in Rhetoric I and teacher recommendation.                             Grade 12

 

This course offers concurrent enrollment in senior English and URI's Writing 101.  A registration fee for the course is determined annually by URI.  Students earn 3 college credits which may be accepted as transfer credit or an exemption to other colleges.  The course emphasizes steps in the writing process, practice in organization of ideas, language skills and rhetorical patterns.  Students work independently on 6-8 research based papers that combine library and field research and personal experience.

 

350  INTRODUCTION TO THEATER                                                                           1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This is a half year course which exposes students to all elements of theatre and play production.  Production is studied but not attempted.  Topics include creative drama, the history of drama, critical analysis of scripts and plays, stage terminology and methods.  This course satisfies the fine art graduation requirement for freshmen and is open to ALL students.

 

351  THEATER                                                                                                                     1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

Theater is taught from an historical perspective.  Students explore the history of theater to understand its use as both an educational vehicle and a form of entertainment.  The process of acting and production are important elements of the course.  Students study and develop facility within each topic activity.  The activities include the following:  mime, oral interpretation, improvisation, scene study, and analysis.

 

363  COLLEGE & CAREER COMMUNICATIONS I                                                     1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

This course focuses on developing the skills in writing, speaking, and reading to be successful in high school, college, and career.  Exploration of careers will be integrated into the course.  Students will demonstrate what they have learned through presentations, essays, seminars, and portfolios. A subject portfolio developed by each student will chart their learning from September to June by reflecting on what they have learned and how they have learned it.  Students enrolled in IMP may have the opportunity to do some interdisciplinary work.  The use of  available technology in both independent work and group work will be expected.   Students will demonstrate their knowledge at the end of the course through an exhibition designed in conjunction with the teacher.

 

 

364  COLLEGE & CAREER COMMUNICATIONS II                                                   1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 10

 

This course continues the process started in College & Career Communications I.  Work in writing, speaking, and reading needed for success in high school, college, and career will continued.  Exploration of careers will be integrated into the course through the use of interviews, guest speakers, and the development of a “dream” resume.  Students will demonstrate what they have learned through presentations, essays, seminars, and portfolios.  A subject portfolio developed by each student will chart their learning from September to June by reflecting on what they have learned and how they have learned it.  Students enrolled in IMP may have the opportunity to do some interdisciplinary work.  The use of available technology in both independent work and group work will be expected.  Students will demonstrate their knowledge at the end of the course through an exhibition designed in conjunction with the teacher.

 

365  COLLEGE & CAREER COMMUNICATIONS III                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This course focuses on writing, speaking, and reading skills used in both the collegiate and career environment.  Writing such as rιsumιs, letters, personal statements, and reflections will be studied.  Speaking and research skills will be developed through group presentations. Readings will primarily be pulled from fiction but will include some non-fiction.  The use of  available technology in both independent work and group work will be expected.  Portfolios will de developed by each student as a means of documenting their work and progress.  Students will demonstrate their knowledge at the end of the course through an exhibition designed in conjunction with the teacher.

 

366  COLLEGE & CAREER COMMUNICATIONS IV                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in College and Career                                             Level 2

                                     Communications I or Rhetoric I and teacher recommendation.              Grade 12

 

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed College & Career Communications III or Rhetoric I.  The course focuses on writing, speaking, and reading connected to technical careers and/or the collegiate environment.  Writing proposals, letters, reflections, and short research-based papers will be studied.  Speaking skills related to interviewing and individual presentations will be stressed.  Readings will be pulled from both nonfiction and fiction.  The development and/or refinement of the portfolio will continue to be a major method of assessment.  The use of  available technology in both independent work and group work will be expected.  Students will demonstrate their knowledge at the end of the course through an exhibition designed in conjunction with the teacher. 

 

 

 

 

 

348  SPORTS LITERATURE                                                                                             ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Much has been written about sports and their influence on the American culture.  In this course the impact of sports from several viewpoints will be studied.  The social and economic values of the American society will be examined while reading such books as Shoeless Joe and March to Madness.  Both nonfiction and fiction pieces will be analyzed.  Films and articles by well-recognized and respected sports writers will also be used to learn more about the connection between the culture of sports and the larger American culture of which it is a part.  Students will be assessed through discussion, writing assignments, and projects that explore the positive or negative impact the sports phenomena has on us as individuals and as a society.

 

 

                                        FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

 

411  FRENCH I                                                                                                                     1 Credit

413  SPANISH I                                                                                                                   Full Year

415  ITALIAN I                                                                                                                      Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

The primary purpose of the Level I courses is to provide students with a sound basis for learning the language as it is spoken and written today.  Practice in all four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) is given, and every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations.  By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system and many of the basic structures in everyday conversation and writing.  The second purpose is to introduce students to French/Spanish/Italian customs and geography.

 

 

421  FRENCH II                                                                                                                   1 Credit

423  SPANISH II                                                                                                                 Full Year

425  ITALIAN II                                                                                                                    Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

             Prerequisite:  Minimum grade of “C-“ in French/Spanish/Italian I.

 

The Level II courses are designed to strengthen the skills acquired in Level I.  The students control of the correct usage, both oral and written, is increased.  Reading becomes more extensive and further introduces the student to French/Spanish/Italian culture, civilization, history, geography and literature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

431  FRENCH III                                                                                                                  1 Credit

433  SPANISH III                                                                                                                Full Year

435  ITALIAN III                                                                                                                   Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

      Prerequisite:  Minimum grade of "C" in French/Spanish/Italian II.

 

The Level III courses continue to intensify the work of Level II.  More intensive classroom work is done to improve the four skills.  Increased emphasis on idiomatic use of the language and the finer points of usage extend the student’s control of the language as a tool.  Required assignments, which include short stories and essays, are more extensive and comprehensive.  A broader knowledge of French/Spanish/Italian civilization and culture will also be acquired by the student.  

 

 

441  FRENCH IV                                                                                                                  1 Credit

443  SPANISH IV                                                                                                                Full Year

445  ITALIAN IV                                                                                                                   Level 1

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

            Prerequisite:  Minimum grade of "C" in French/Spanish/Italian III.                                               

 

The Level IV courses are designed to increase proficiency in the basic language skills.  Reading is emphasized and it provides a basis for most of the oral and written activities.  The chief concentration is on contemporary authors with a focus on the culture of French, Spanish, and Italian speaking countries.

 

Students may concurrently enroll in fourth year foreign language offerings in either Spanish, Italian or French and Rhode Island College’s Intermediate (Spanish, Italian or French) course #113.  A registration fee for the course is determined annually by R.I.C.  Students earn 3 college credits which may be accepted as transfer credit or an exemption to other colleges.

 

 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

 

500 TECHNOLOGY I                                                                                                       1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-10

 

Students learn how industrial society produces the products needed to satisfy the needs and wants of the culture.  Students use hand tools, power tools, and machines to duplicate the operations and processes currently found in the manufacturing society

 

505 DRAFTING I                                                                                                              1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-10

 

Students learn how engineers and architects communicate ideas through the language of drafting. Students make machine parts and architectural drawings using traditional tools and Computer Assisted Drafting (CAD) equipment.

 

510  TECHNOLOGY II                                                                                                     1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Students will learn the traditional and modern technologies used in woodworking, metal layout procedures, oxyacetylene welding, and production procedures.  Students will experience each of these areas through design and production of various projects.

 

 

530  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN                                                                                  1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Students will learn the basics of how loads and forces are used to design buildings and bridges.  Students will produce architectural drawings from foundation to roof.

 

 

535  CONSTRUCTION                                                                                                     1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Students will learn residential framing methods by constructing garden sheds and other construction projects.

 

 

540  MACHINE PARTS DRAFTING                                                                             1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Students learn how to produce machine parts drawings in the form of three view, isometric, and section views of various machine parts.  A strong emphasis is placed on Computer Assisted Drafting (CAD).

 

 

545  ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING                                                                            1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Students learn how architects design and produce drawings for residential homes.  Students are expected to design and draw plans for a residential home.  Students will also use computer aided drafting software to layout a typical floor plan.

 

 

 

547  LAND SURVEYING I                                                                                                ½  Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This course will focus on the art of measuring distances and angles on the surface of the Earth.  Students will use mathematical approaches to analyze and adjust field survey data.  The proper means of locating existing structures and the means to define the location of proposed structures will be the goal of this class.

 

548  LAND SURVEYING II                                                                                              ½  Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Land Surveying I.                                                     Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Students will use the information learned in Land Surveying I to acquire field data and process math computations to produce surveying maps of large and small parcels of land.  The proper means of finding and analyzing existing property records will also be a goal of this class.

 

 

                                            HUMAN SERVICES

 

550  BASIC FOODS                                                                                                          1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This course is an introduction to foods and basic cooking skills.  Learn more about nutrition, food safety and sanitation, and basic culinary skills.  Prepare tasty foods and master culinary skills utilizing the Food Guide Pyramid.  Labs, demonstrations and culinary speakers are included in this course.

 

 

552  ADVANCED FOODS                                                                                                  ½ Credit

                                                      One Semester

Pre-requisite:  Successful completion of Basic Foods.                        Level 2

                                                      Grades 10-12

 

This course is an introduction to foreign foods, building on skills gained from successful completion of Basic Foods.  Students have a chance to prove themselves in the kitchen.  Cooking skills, organizational techniques, time and resource planning, meal service, and creativity in meal planning are stressed.  Student will experiment with international and regional cooking, including social and cultural backgrounds of various countries. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

560 BASIC SEWING                                                                                                         1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

Learn wardrobe coordination, basic sewing skills and simple repairs.  Create your own projects using commercial patterns as well as develop a class project to benefit a local community service organization.

 

565  SPORTS NUTRITION                                                                                                ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

The Sports Nutrition course would be designed for all students who wanted to improve their knowledge of nutrition and make behavior changes to enhance their health.  The course would take students from where they are on a nutrition continuum and through many self-assessment activities, help and encourage them to make better nutrition choices.  The course would include videos, guest speakers, and learning activities to encourage behavior changes.

 

570  CHILD DEVELOPMENT I                                                                                      1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Planning to be a parent someday?  This class is a must for you as well as for future teachers and child care workers.  Students learn how to make decisions about parenting based on the responsibilities, resources, and skills needed to be a good care giver.  Topics include parenting, pregnancy, prenatal care and development, birth and infancy. 

 

580  CHILD DEVELOPMENT  II                                                                                   1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of "C" in Child Development I,                                                 Level 2

                            and teacher recommendation.                                                               Grades 10-12

 

Enjoy young children?  Learn more about toddlers, parenting skills and preschool children. This class is responsible for planning lessons and teaching in a preschool program.  Students interested in child care careers or in teaching will receive valuable hands on experience.  Special topics related to children are included in this course.

 

590  INDEPENDENT LIVING                                                                                         1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Can you make it on your own?...get and keep a job?...buy or rent a home?...prepare simple meals?...do the wash?...what about insurance?...buy a new or used car?  Learn these basic survival skills and more.  Students will take part in a simulation which takes them from graduation to a complete independent living experience.  Also included in the course are interview techniques, resume writing and career research.

 

MATHEMATICS

 

610  MATH 9                                                                                                                        1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

What is the best process for making sense of data?  What is the importance of interpreting and writing symbolic expressions?  What are mathematical models and what is their importance?  How can the Pythagorean Theorem be used to solve problems?  How are kaleidoscopes, hubcaps, and mirrors connected? While answering these questions students learn how to pose questions and collect, analyze and interpret data. They learn how to use symbolic expressions to represent and reason through numerical situations and to solve equations.  Students explore the advantages of using algebraic models in the form of graphs and equations to describe situations.  They explore the Pythagorean Theorem and irrational numbers as well as review and make connections among the concepts of area, distance, slope, and rational numbers. They learn to recognize and create designs with symmetry.  All units in Math 9 focus on probability and statistics, geometry, and algebra concepts.

 

614  ALGEBRA I                                                                                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

The language through which most of mathematics is communicated is Algebra.  It is a symbol system for communicating quantitative information and relationships.  Throughout this course, instruction and activities aim to develop the student’s confidence in his/her ability to make decisions, to solve problems analytically, to utilize current technology, and to acquire an appreciation for the power that Algebra lends people in understanding the real world.  Communication and writing skills are also emphasized.  An understanding of algebraic concepts is a requirement for most entry-level career opportunities as well as the foundation for all higher levels of mathematics.

 

615  ALGEBRA II ACCELERATED                                                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of  “C” in grade 8 Algebra I                                                    Level 1

                            and teacher recommendation.                                                                        Grade 9

 

While the material covered in this course is mostly the same as that in Algebra II, students are expected to place a greater emphasis on analysis and employ a higher level of critical thinking skills.  Students take a more active role in the learning process through student demonstrations and explanations that are communicated in both written and oral formats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

624  GEOMETRY                                                                                                                 1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Algebra I.                                                                Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

This is a course in plane Euclidean Geometry.  Emphasis is placed on the deductive reasoning process while algebraic skills and concepts are integrated into activities.  Students learn how to think logically and become confident problem solvers. All activities focus on the role of an axiomatic system of investigation and proof in comparing, contrasting, and developing the properties of geometric shapes.

 

 

625  GEOMETRY ACCELERATED                                                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of  “C” in Algebra II Accelerated                                            Level 1

                              and teacher recommendation.                                                                    Grade 10

 

While the material covered in this course is mostly the same as that in Geometry, students are expected to place a greater emphasis on analysis and employ a higher level of critical thinking skills.  Students take a more active role in the learning process through student demonstrations and explanations that are communicated in both written and oral formats.

 

 

634  ALGEBRA II                                                                                                                1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Algebra I.                                                                Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Students examine data and its graphical representation and then answer the question “how can functions be used to discover relationships, make predictions, and solve problems?”  The focus of this course is on applying linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, analyzing problem situations and finding optimal solutions to problems involving two variables.  A graphing calculator is used throughout the course to introduce concepts, to aid students in applying critical thinking skills, and to strengthen their knowledge base.

 

 

640  COLLEGE MATH                                                                                                     1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Full credit earned in Algebra II and Geometry.                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Fine-tune your Algebra and Geometry skills.  Practice using these skills to answer typical SAT questions.  Explore the concepts of sets and logical reasoning.  This course emphasizes mathematical ideas and their applications.  If your college plans include mathematics for liberal arts students, a topics course in contemporary mathematics, or a finite mathematics course; College Math is the preparation you need.                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

641  PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS                                                                        1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Full credit earned in Algebra II.                                                                       Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

The study of probability and statistics is concerned with random phenomena.  Learn how counting principals, patterning, and observation of data can be useful in predicting a measure of the likely hood that an event will occur. Learn how statistical data can be useful in making intelligent decisions, or how it can be helpful in making predictions.

 

 

645  ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS                                                                 1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry                               Level 1

                            Accelerated and  teacher recommendation.                                                 Grade 12

                                                                                                                                                           

Students develop an understanding of function behavior by using the unifying themes of continuity, limit, derivative, integral, approximation, application, and modeling. Activities emphasize a multi-representational approach with concepts, results, and problems, being expressed graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally.  Technology is used regularly by students and teacher to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm work, to perform investigations, and to assist in interpreting results.  Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding, skills and techniques, and communicating ideas in both written and oral formats.  Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination at the end of the course.

 

 

650  TRIGONOMETRY/ANALYTIC GEOMETRY                                                         1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Algebra II.                                                               Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry is a study of functions and their graphs.  Special focus is placed on understanding polynomial and rational functions, trigonometric functions, conics, polar coordinates and complex numbers, and vectors.  Students explore relationships between functions and their graphs using a graphing calculator.  The concepts developed in this course provide the foundation for a successful Introduction to Calculus or Calculus experience.

 

 

655  TRIGONOMETRY/ANALYTIC GEOMETRY ACCELERATED                          1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Geometry Accelerated                                              Level 1

                             and teacher recommendation.                                                                     Grade 11

 

While the material covered in this course is mostly the same as that in Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry, students are expected to place a greater emphasis on analysis and employ a higher level of critical thinking skills.  Students take a more active role in the learning process through student demonstrations and explanations that are communicated in both written and oral formats.

 

 

660  INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I                                                                      1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in                                                                                Level 2

                            Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry.                                                                Grade 12

 

After exploring domain, range, and arithmetic functions; students are introduced to the concepts of limit and derivative of a function. Problems dealing with rate of change as an application of derivatives are also investigated.  Students will also study logarithmic functions, exponential functions, and some integration techniques.  A thorough familiarity with functions and their graphs is important because many are mathematical representations of situations found in the real-world.

 

665  INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS II                                                                     1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Introduction to Calculus I.                                         Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Students extend the discussion of differential calculus to include differentiation of transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, and further applications of the derivative such as curve sketching. Also students develop an understanding of integration.  The exploration of these calculus concepts is done from both a graphical and numerical approach.

 

671  IMP I                                                                                                                             1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

What is it about a pattern that helps us to work on and think about mathematics?  What is the optimum strategy for playing a dice game called The Game of Pig?  How can families pack up their earthly goods, go in covered wagons across largely uncharted territory and survive?  Does the hero in Edgar Allan Poe’s classic short story The Pit and the Pendulum really have time to carry our his escape plan?  How long is a shadow?  While answering these questions in year one, students learn about functions, probability, graphing, statistics, and similarity.

 

672  IMP II                                                                                                                            1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 10

 

Why use equations to represent real-life situations?  Data, data, data --- is there really a difference between what you can infer from a sample and what is really happening?  Do bees build it best?  How can a bakery maximize its profit?  What is the importance of the strange cake and beverage Alice finds in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland?  While answering these questions in year 2, students learn about equations and functions, statistical investigations, area, Pythagorean Theorem, surface area and volume, trigonometry, similarity, linear programming, and exponentiation.

 

 

 

 

673  IMP III                                                                                                                          1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite: Full credit earned in IMP II                                                                             Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

What is the plan for creating a fireworks display that will use rockets launched from the top of a tower?  How long will it take before the trees grow so large in a circular orchard hideout that someone outside the orchard cannot see into the center of the orchard?  Meadows or malls? Learn about decision making and land use.  If population growth continues to follow its current pattern, how long will it be until people are squashed up against each other?  One team has a three-game lead over its closest rival for the baseball pennant.  Each team has seven games to go in the season (none of which are between these two teams).  What is the probability that the team that is leading will win the pennant?  While answering these questions in year three, students will learn about quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; area and circumference of circles; distance and midpoint formulas; distance from a point to a line; geometric proofs; similar triangles; trigonometry; Pythagorean theorem; linear programming; solving systems of linear equations; graphing equations in three variables; matrices; exponential functions; logarithms; and probability.

 

 

674  IMP IV                                                                                                                           1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite: Full credit earned in IMP III.                                                                          Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Imagine you are consultants for a circus.  In the unit High Dive, you will investigate a circus act that involves someone diving off a high platform attached to a Ferris wheel into a small tub of water.  You will need to figure out exactly when the diver should let go so he goes “splash!”  Did you every wonder how animators create all of those wonderful effects you see on the movie screen?  In the unit As the Cube Turns, you will learn the mathematics behind computer animation and create your own animation programs on a graphing calculator.  In the unit Know How, you will experience situations in which you need to learn mathematics that you have not encountered before.  Learn how to investigate some resources and methods for independent learning.  The unit, The World of Functions, gives you the opportunity to look back over your past work in mathematics and examine the roles played by functions.  In this unit, you will pull together ideas about functions that you studied previously, and you will learn new ways of thinking about functions.  It is one thing to take a poll of potential voters.  It is another thing to determine what the results of the poll really mean.  Through the central problem in the unit, The Pollster’s Dilemma, you will experiment to see how much variation can occur from one poll to another, even when the polls are taken from the same population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEDIA/COMMUNICATIONS

 

380  RADIO/VIDEO PRODUCTION                                                                                 1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Learn how to effectively use a camcorder.  Develop skills in video composition, continuity, use of transitions and special effects, while working in small groups on high interest projects.  Prepare a newscast, puppet show, commercial, music video, travelogue, etc., etc.  Learn basic post-production skills on a linear editing system.  Be an integral part of WNHS Live as a DJ, sportscaster or technician.  Develop analytical and critical viewing skills as you watch a number of classic American films.  Contribute to the Senior Video yearbook.

 

381  ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION                                                                        1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Radio/Video Production or Teacher Approval                                                   Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Expand upon your knowledge and skills learned in your other communication classes.  Emphasis is placed on creating high level projects including documentaries, public service announcements, instructional tapes, community and intro-school special events.  Learn advanced videography and post-production techniques.  Work with both linear and non-linear editing systems.  Continue developing analytical and critical viewing skills as you examine classic film.  Contribute to the Senior Video Yearbook.

 

385  FILM APPRECIATION                                                                                               1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Broaden your understanding  and appreciation of film and filmmaking as we look behind the scenes of many of the classic films of all time.  This course is designed to enhance the viewing experience by learning how to analyze and critically evaluate the film medium.  Learn about film genre, film techniques, camera work, production design, editing, career profiles, etc., etc.  You will be exposed to such classics as Casablanca, The Grapes of Wrath, It Happened One Night, The Wizard of Oz, The Graduate, Cool Hand Luke, North by Northwest and many, many more.  An excellent foundation course for video production classes.

 

390  MASS MEDIA (Journalism)                                                                                        1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

Mass Media deals with the basics of newspaper reporting and writing.  Included in the program is a historical perspective of news media, application of rhetorical skills and newspaper production.  Emphasis is placed on utilizing technology for the acquisition of information and the development of a newspaper.  Students produce four issues of the school newspaper and are presented with the opportunity of contributing to the area’s local publications.

 

 

                                                        MUSIC

 

 

700/705  CONCERT BAND/HONORS BAND                                                                  1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                     Level 2/Level 1

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

The Mariner Band provides music for home football games, including Thanksgiving.  In addition to performing at graduation, formal concerts will be scheduled in December and May.  Music Festivals will be attended when deemed appropriate and applicable.  Music literature studied will include marches, concert marches, pops and symphonic band.  Members of the band are required to practice daily, attend all rehearsals and performances and show continuous individual improvement throughout the year.   

 

In addition to the normal requirements and activities associated with band membership, the student may earn level one credit if the following criteria are met:

·                    Solo Audition:  Each student must prepare for and audition at RIMEA All-State Festival (Fall Semester).

·                    Solo/Ensemble Performances:  Each student must prepare for and participate as a soloist at the RIMEA Solo and Ensemble Festival (spring semester).

·                    Attendance at Supplementary Concerts:  Each student must attend at least one supplementary concert per semester and write a review with specific guidelines (Director’s approval required).

·                    Private Lessons:  Each student is required to take a minimum of 2 private lessons per month with a professional player-teacher of his or her instrument.

·                    Solo Performance at School:  Each student is required to perform one solo with piano accompaniment each semester at the Holiday and Spring Concert.

 

710  CHORUS                                                                                                                       1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

Chorus is a performance based group open to all interested vocal students.  A variety of vocal styles are studied with emphasis on proper tone production and technique.  Students are required to practice daily, attend all rehearsals and performances and show continuous individual improvement throughout the year.

 

720  GUITAR I                                                                                                                   1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This class is designed for the beginning guitarist only.  Students in this course cover the basics of guitar technique including:  finger picking, flat picking, chord strumming and note reading.  A variety of guitar styles are studied including:  Folk, Classical, and The Blues.  (Students with more advanced playing and/or reading skills might want to consider an Independent Study Program or utilizing study hall time for individualized instruction.)

722  GUITAR II                                                                                                                   ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This class is designed for the intermediate player.  The techniques studied will go beyond basic flat-picking and note reading and include advanced chord positions (including bar chords).  For the aggressive player, jazz substitution chords and 5th position melodies will be included.

 

730  MUSIC THEORY                                                                                                      1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This is an introduction to the fundamentals of music and composition.  It includes the learning of major and minor scale construction, intervals, clefs, rhythms, modes and form.  Exercises in sight reading and dictation will also be offered.  Students gain experience in writing and harmonizing original melodies.

 

740  MUSIC APPRECIATION                                                                                         1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This course focuses on the general understanding of the art of listening.  Students learn how to perceive the artistic content of music and be able to react with feeling to that content.  The art, social, historical, and literary influences of all periods are discussed with emphasis on how they relate to music.  This course enriches the students' knowledge of music and help to develop a greater appreciation of our musical heritage.  A variety of media are included (videos, CD's, Synthesizers, and field trips).

 

750  PIANO I                                                                                                                        ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

Students will have the opportunity to learn to play the piano.  These same techniques can also be applied to modern electronic (digital) keyboards and computer based music programs.  Students will learn basic piano skills and be exposed to numerous excerpts of classic piano literature.  The outcome of their studies will be proficiency in reading, performing, and understanding any piece of piano music of appropriate level.

 

752  PIANO II                                                                                                                      ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                         Grades 9-12

 

This class is designed for the intermediate performer.  In addition to performing classic literature at the appropriate level, students will learn to improvise accompaniments to popular folk songs using basic chords and a bass line in several keys.  Major scales will be introduced and performed with both hands.                                                           

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH EDUCATION

 

009-012  PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

Physical Education is a mandatory course which enables students to attain a level of physical fitness commensurate with their own capabilities.  Through the teaching of basic skills and competitive, organized play, students show mental, emotional and social growth.  The Students will attain a basic knowledge and understanding of various sports activities.  By providing students with opportunities to discover and develop their personal talents in various carry-over sports, it is hoped that vigorous physical activity is continued throughout their lifetime to maintain strong healthy minds and bodies.

 

All activities are arranged in a sequential scope.  Each succeeding year in the curriculum, students have a chance to build their mastery.  All students must successfully complete 2 units of Physical Education/Health from grade 9 through grade 12 in this sequence:

            Grade 9:                       .5 credits

            Grade 10:                     .5 credits

            Grade 11:                     .5 credits

            Grade 12:                     .5 credits

 

P.E. is a selective course which offers a comprehensive series of options from which students must choose a four quarter individualized program.  Some of the selections available are as follows:


·        Adventure Education Activities

·        Aerobics/Conditioning

·        Archery

·        Badminton

·        Basketball

·        Fencing

·        Fitness

·        Flag Football

·        Floor Hockey

·        High Rope Adventure Activities

·        LaCrosse

·        Low Rope Adventure Activities

·        Ping Pong

·        Pickleball

·        Project Adventure

·        Soccer

·        Softball

·        Speedball

·        Team Handball

·        Tennis

·        Volleyball

·        Weight Training

 


 

109  HEALTH 9                                                                                                                                

 

Health 9 topics include, but are not limited to:  physical fitness; nutrition and weight control; stress; suicide education and prevention - Samaritans model; substance abuse; sexually transmitted diseases including AIDS.

 

110  HEALTH 10                                                                                                                              

 

The primary focus of this course is human sexuality and family life.  Topics or subject areas covered in this course include, but are not limited to:  dating and relationships, marriage, parenthood, contraception, pregnancy & birth, adoption, infertility, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, the effects of drugs on the developing embryo, and fetal alcohol syndrome.

111  HEALTH 11

 

This course is devoted to developing life saving first aid and CPR skills.  The American Red Cross Standard First Aid & CPR models are used.

 

 

112  HEALTH 12

 

The primary focus of this course is Mental Health.  Topic areas and subjects discussed include, but are not limited to:  personality & personality types, stress, phobias, obsessive and compulsive behavior, anxiety, depression, hypochondria, schizophrenia, manic depression, multiple personalities, birth defects caused by substance abuse, mental retardation, autism, death, dying and grief, and eating disorders.

 

 

 

SCIENCE

 

802  GREENHOUSE AND LANDSCAPE                                                                          1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

A great hands-on class learning experience about greenhouse operation - working with plants, building landscape models and being introduced to the FFA and its many activities.  Join us!

 

 

803  HORTICULTURE I                                                                                                     1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

An introduction to horticulture with areas of study in turf, plant propagation techniques, floral design and landscape principles.  In this course students learn the importance of soils and land use while working with other students on lab type projects.

 

 

804  HORTICULTURE II: LANDSCAPE DESIGN                                                       1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Horticulture I or Biology I.                                                                              Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Travel to the "Big E" and work with fellow students.  Learn how to draw a landscape design.  Learn how to identify plants.   What do we need to do to keep plants healthy?  Find out how on our visits to local nurseries or tree farms.  Compete in contests with local schools.  Set up a hydroponics program and grow your own vegetables!

 

 

 

 

805  HORTICULTURE II: LANDSCAPE APPLICATION                                           1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Horticulture I or Biology I                                                                               Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Learn how to build a patio, brick walk or stonewall.  Find out how to tell how much soil, seed, etc. you need for any project.  All classes can choose to participate for an entire year - even in the summer - by competing at local fairs in such areas as woodsman contest, safe tractor driving, landscape design, dairy showmanship, etc.  Most have cash prizes for top places!  Get involved, get educated, and pick out a great career.

 

806  HORTICULTURE III:  Specialty Plant Production                                                   ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One semester

      Pre-requisite:  Horticulture II.                                                                                               Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Horticulture III is a semester course designed to provide a unique opportunity for students to build upon the foundation laid in Horticulture I and II and bring them to an advanced level in horticulture management.

 

 

807  HORTICULTURE III:  Landscape Construction                                                      ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One semester

      Pre-requisite:  Horticulture II.                                                                                               Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Horticulture III is a semester course designed to provide a unique opportunity for students to build upon the foundation laid in Horticulture I and II and bring them to an advanced level in horticulture management.

 

813  EARTH SCIENCE                                                                                                        1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

Have you ever wondered where Nature's treasures come from?  Why earthquakes occur?  How volcanoes come to life?  What a million year old fossil can tell us?  Are you awed by Nature's fury sending rain, snow or drought?  And at night when you look into the sky at the vast galaxies in our universe do you wonder - how did it all begin?  Are we alone?  These and many other questions will be explored in Earth Science through hands-on activities.  We'll use all our skills finally in a geological field trip to Block Island, our gift from the glaciers!

 

This course is for ninth graders and has no pre-requisite except a willingness to learn while working with others.

 

 

 

 

 

823  BIOLOGY I                                                                                                                    l Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of "C" in Earth Science.                                                          Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 10-12

 

We see why leaves turn orange, why roots grow down - all through experimentation.  We look at DNA fingerprinting, make our own slides, work with chemicals of life, plants, animals, heredity and lots more.

 

 

825  BIOLOGY I ACCELERATED                                                                                    1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of "B" in Earth Science                                                           Level 1

                            and teacher recommendation.                                                                      Grade 10

 

Exploration in this course enhances the college biology material with special activities to foster independent thinking through higher level student-developed investigations.  We analyze implications of scientific discoveries and discuss your viewpoints substantiated with facts, theories and observations.

 

 

826  BIOLOGY II                                                                                                                 1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite: Minimum grade of "C" in Biology I                                                                    Level 2

                           and teacher recommendation.                                                                Grades 11-12

 

Plague!  Cholera!  Smallpox!  All sorts of epidemics!  Be a disease detective.  Plan and perform experiments.  Learn bacteriology techniques.  What causes a giant?  How can we control malaria?  This course includes human physiology and anatomy with related lab experiences.  We listen to speakers from the hospital.  If you are thinking about any medical related field, sports medicine, research, any life science, or are just interested in doing advanced work in biology, we'd be glad to have you sign up!

 

 

828  BIOLOGY II ACCELERATED                                                                                   1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B” in Biology I Accelerated                                               Level 1

      and teacher recommendation.                                                                                            Grade 11

 

Human Anatomy, Physiology and Microbiology are combined for a course that has an emphasis on research.  Speakers will include a physical therapist, research biologist, medicinal plant expert, etc.  Join us and look into DNA electrophoresis, sports medicine and related fields.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

830  ECOLOGY                                                                                                                 1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Biology I or Horticulture II                                                                              Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Where do Gila monsters live?  How can polar bears survive?  Why are wolves being brought into Idaho?  From deserts to rainforests, oceans to grasslands, diversity and similarities are discussed. This course explores interactions between living things and their environment.  Students participate in field investigations as well as laboratory experiments.

 

831  ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE                                                                              1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

      Pre-requisite:  Biology  I or Horticulture II                                                                             Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

Help monitor our rivers.  Do chemical testing of our water and soil.  This course emphasizes Man's impact on Nature.  We use nearby ponds, streams and woods as an outdoor laboratory.  Learn how to protect our environment.

 

833  CHEMISTRY I                                                                                                             1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “C” in Biology I and                                                            Level 2

                             Algebra II taken previously or concurrently.                                           Grade 11-12

 

You are expected to learn chemical facts and principles by being actively involved and doing chemistry.  It is required that you keep and maintain an individual lab notebook that shows your progress in collecting, organizing, and interpreting experimental data.  You are expected to find patterns and relationships, perform mathematical calculations and construct graphs.  This foundation course in chemistry begins by investigating the physical and chemical properties of matter, then proceeds logically to the mathematics of formulas and equations, the organization of the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonding, and finally with the chemistry of solutions.

 

835  CHEMISTRY I ACCELERATED                                                                               1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of "B" in Biology I Accelerated,  minimum                                Level 1

                            grade of “B” in Algebra II, and teacher recommendation.                        Grade 11-12

 

You are expected to learn chemical facts and principles by being actively involved and doing chemistry.  It is required that you keep and maintain an individual lab notebook that shows your progress in collecting, organizing, and interpreting experimental data.  You are expected to find patterns and relationships, perform mathematical calculations and construct graphs.  This course follows the same general format of Chemistry 833, but each topic is covered more intensively, especially mathematically.  Students also write several short papers on topical issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

836  CHEMISTRY II                                                                                                            1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of "C" in Chemistry I                                                               Level 2

                            and teacher recommendation.                                                                      Grade 12

 

You are expected to learn chemical facts and principles by being actively involved and doing chemistry.  It is required that you keep and maintain an individual lab notebook that shows your progress in collecting, organizing, and interpreting experimental data.  You are expected to find patterns and relationships, perform mathematical calculations and construct graphs.  This course covers the topics of oxidation-reduction, kinetics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and organic, nuclear, and descriptive chemistry.  Students are required to do a research paper in the 3rd quarter, and a miniproject in the 4th quarter.

 

 

843  PHYSICS                                                                                                                       1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Algebra II and teacher recommendation.                                                          Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

The study of physics with an emphasis on laboratory experience and demonstrations as well as problem solving.  Traditional physics with practical applications for our technological world for students preparing for a four year college program.

 

 

845  PHYSICS ACCELERATED                                                                                         1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B” in Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry.                              Level 1

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

This course is designed for students interested in engineering and other physical sciences as a career.  It is a high level study of motion and forces, waves, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and atoms and nuclei.  Mathematics and problem solving are emphasized throughout. Lab exercises reinforce the concepts discussed in class.

 

 

847  ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS                                                                      1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Consistently achieving a grade of B or better in level-one                                  Level 1

                             Math courses and concurrent enrollment in calculus.                                    Grade 12

 

This course employs a rigorous mathematical treatment of the principles and concepts of physics. Topics include motion, forces, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics, and relativity.  This class will be taught at the college level and will culminate in the talking of the AP Physics B exam in the spring.  In addition, there will be a summer reading assignment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

900  GOVERNMENT/APPLIED ECONOMICS                                                               1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

The first semester of this course is designed to familiarize each student with the workings of the Federal, State, and Local governments.  The purpose of the class is to educate young citizens about how various levels of government affect their daily lives.  Special attention is given to examining the Constitution and its influence on the American government system.  Frequent discussions about current events relating to government, the courts and the rights of citizens enhance the students' learning and participation.

 

 

 

There are three major objectives to the Applied Economics semester of this course:  1) students will learn that economic decision making is part of political choice and that ignorance of economics prevents citizens from making informed choices;  2) students will learn that historical and current events are the raw material for analysis of U.S. economic history;  3) students will learn that from an economic viewpoint, the history of the world is the history of people and nations making decisions about how to use resources found in specific geographic areas of the world.  Economic terms and their applications will be promoted throughout the course.

 

903  GOVERNMENT/APPLIED ECONOMICS                                                               1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

The first semester of this course is designed for those students who wish to pursue their formal education beyond high school.  Students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge through their writing, speaking, and thinking skills.  The students become familiar with the various governmental systems throughout the world.  Special attention is directed towards the American constitutional system.  Students read, discuss, and analyze the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and various Supreme Court decisions.  Various teaching techniques and simulation exercises are employed to engage students and develop their critical thinking skills.

 

There are three major objectives to the Applied Economics semester of this course:  1) students will learn that economic decision making is part of political choice and that ignorance of economics prevents citizens from making informed choices;  2) students will learn that historical and current events are the raw material for analysis of U.S. economic history;  3) students will learn that from an economic viewpoint, the history of the world is the history of people and nations making decisions about how to use resources found in specific geographic areas of the world.  Economic terms and their applications will be promoted throughout the course.

 

 

 

 

 

905  GOVERNMENT/APPLIED ECONOMICS ACCELERATED                                1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Teacher recommendation.                                                                               Level 1

                                                                                                                                                Grade 9

 

The first semester of this course applies the same content covered in the 903 Government/Applied Economics course;  however, it supplements the curriculum by exploring issues in greater detail and by using primary sources to examine specific political writers and thinkers.  Examples of this are:  Plato's Crito,  The Magna Carta, Stephen Hopkins, The Rights of the Colonies Examined, The Federalist Papers, etc.  Controversial issues are discussed and debated.  Many teacher prepared materials supplement the text.

 

There are three major objectives to the Applied Economics semester of this course:  1) students will learn that economic decision making is part of political choice and that ignorance of economics prevents citizens from making informed choices;  2) students will learn that historical and current events are the raw material for analysis of U.S. economic history;  3) students will learn that from an economic viewpoint, the history of the world is the history of people and nations making decisions about how to use resources found in specific geographic areas of the world.  Economic terms and their applications will be promoted throughout the course.

 

920  WORLD HISTORY                                                                                                      1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                              Grade 10

 

This course develops within each student the various skills necessary to study the history and geography of our world.  Students survey those historical events, individuals and ideas so important to the development of the history of various cultures throughout the world.

 

923  WORLD HISTORY                                                                                                      1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 10

 

This course is designed for students who wish to pursue their formal education beyond high school.  Students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge through their writing, speaking and thinking skills.  Students survey the history of various cultures throughout our world.  Special emphasis is directed towards the development of Western Civilization.  Students are exposed to the social, political and economic history of the world's people.

 

925  WORLD HISTORY ACCELERATED/HUMANITIES                                            1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

            Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B+” in Government 9 Accelerated,                               Level 1

                                  English 9 Accelerated and teacher recommendation.                               Grade 10

 

This course combines English 10 Accelerated and World History Accelerated.  The teachers collaborate by integrating major cultural and historical themes and eras.  All facets of the English and History curriculum are studied.  This course emphasizes western civilization, but does not ignore Asian civilizations.  Strong emphasis is placed on independent and group investigation, presentation, and performance in speech and writing.  Students need to be very responsible and motivated learners.

930  UNITED STATES HISTORY                                                                                      1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 3

                                                                                                                                              Grade 11

 

This course develops within each student the skills necessary to study the history and geography of our nation.  Students trace the social, economic, political, and cultural development of the United States from pre-history to the present.   The use of projects, local trips, and guest speakers maybe utilized.  The student is exposed to a "hands-on" approach to the history of our nation.  This course emphasizes the basic skills and knowledge of U.S. history by studying famous American personalities.

 

933  UNITED STATES HISTORY                                                                                      1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 11

 

This course is designed for those students who wish to pursue their formal education beyond high school.  Students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge through their writing, speaking, and thinking skills.

 

This survey course of United States history exposes students to the cultural, political, economic, and social developments of our nation.  Students engage in in-depth reading and writing assignments on various historical topics.  Classroom discussions analyze various issues and aid in the development of each student's critical thinking skills.

 

935  ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY                                     1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B+” in World History Accelerated.                                    Level 1

                                                                                                                                              Grade 11

 

This course is designed for motivated students who wish to prepare for the Advanced Placement exam.  The course requires students to engage in intensive reading in primary source documents, to develop ideas in weekly essays, and to participate in self-directed learning activities.  Students have the opportunity to analyze the cultural, political, economic, and social developments of our nation's history.

 

940  CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                                                              1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This course investigates the criminal justice system of the United States.  We investigate the police, the courts, and the corrections department as well as the society that produces criminal behavior.  We review the criminal laws and the criminal process from arrest to conviction.  The impact of various court decisions on the criminal justice system is considered.  Students explore law enforcement and related careers.

 

 

941  YOUTH AND THE LAW                                                                                          1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This one semester elective course is available to all juniors and seniors.  This course is designed to introduce students to the American legal system as they are about the exit school and enter the "real world".  Based on the premise that ignorance of the law is no excuse, we attempt to introduce students to those laws and legal problems that they confront in everyday living.  Teaching techniques include a mix of simulations, discussions, guest speakers, and courtroom visitations.

 

 

942  THE U.S. AND THE WORLD - 1945-PRESENT                                                   1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This student-centered class is an examination of America's most recent history.  It allows students to examine the many roles the U.S. has played around the world during the years since WW II.  The class is a lively, discussion oriented class through which students gain a "close up" view of how the past has shaped the present.  Topics include the atomic bomb, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Central America Policies, the CIA, the Cold War and social issues of each decade. Role playing, mock trials, weekly discussion sessions, student presentations and guest speakers are part of this class.   

 

 

943  CONTEMPORARY ISSUES                                                                                    1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

This class is designed to help every student understand the importance of following current events.  The class uses Newsweek as its textbook and each student receives a copy of the magazine weekly.  Three periods per week are devoted to an examination of major news stories and trends as they are happening.  Students participate in deciding which topics are discussed and in leading the discussions.  Major issues such as foreign policy, illegal immigration, welfare, the homeless, discrimination, crime and punishment are just a few of the themes that are discussed throughout the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

944  SOCIOLOGY, SOCIALIZATION AND PSYCHOLOGY                                      1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

The Social Studies Department offers a senior program on issues and topics in the Social Studies. The Social Studies senior program offers courses that will enhance the competencies essential for self-development, positive human relationships, participation in a representative democracy, and a market economy.  This program utilizes content selected and adapted from the several social sciences as the tools for the acquisition and development of knowledge, skills, attitudes, processes and competencies in the topic areas.  Each course is a half year offering.  Sociology, Socialization and Psychology will, utilizing the disciplines of sociology and psychology along with insights gleamed from other social sciences, examine the cycle of life.  In addition, topics on how the individual discovers and interprets the world around him/her will be analyzed.  With the acquisition of this knowledge, the student will better be able to develop the competencies essential for self-development and positive human relationships.

 

945  SOCIAL AND ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                        1/2 Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                       Grades 11-12

 

The Social Studies Department offers a senior program on issues and topics in the Social Studies.  The Social Studies senior program offers courses that will enhance the competencies essential for self-development, positive human relationships, participation in a representative democracy and a market economy.  This program utilizes content selected and adapted from the several social sciences as the tools for the acquisition and development of knowledge, skills, attitudes, processes and competencies in the topic areas.  Each course is a half year offering.  In Social and Abnormal Psychology, the student will, utilizing the disciplines of sociology, psychology and other social sciences, analyze who they are and how they interact with others in order that they may better develop competencies essential for self-development and positive human relationships.

 

947  ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY                                                            1 Credit

                                                                                                                                              Full Year

      Pre-requisite:  Minimum grade of “B+” in US History or                                                         Level 1

                            AP US History.                                                                                          Grade 12

 

This course is an opportunity for students to pursue college-level studies and to receive advanced placement and credit.  The course provides an introduction to concepts and issues in psychology. This course would provide students with a chance to demonstrate scholarship on a national level, to study psychology in greater depth, to improve their chances of being accepted by the college of their choice and be exempted from introductory psychology in college.  Students will demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of a college-level subject, develop analytical reasoning skills and form disciplined study habits that can contribute to continued success at the college level.  Students must take AP Psychology exam upon completion of course.

 

 

 

 

948  ETHICS                                                                                                                        ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

Ethics is the study of and an exploration into the morals and values dictated by the accepted behavior of civilized societies.  Incorporating the teachings of eastern and western philosophies, discussion topics will range from individual choice to societal acceptance and human development in an ever-changing psychosocial world.  Accepted behaviors and practices currently in place will be challenged and examined in the hopes that a true understanding of self-determination and global awareness can co-exist.

 

949  COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGIONS                                                                 ½ Credit

                                                                                                                                       One Semester

                                                                                                                                                 Level 2

                                                                                                                                              Grade 12

 

All human societies have endeavored on the universal quest to understand the purpose and meaning of life.  Philosophy and science provide some answers to these questions, but are pre-dated by older and more strongly held beliefs.  This class is designed to give students a broad overview of the world’s major religious interpretations of this quest.  It will offer insights into the origins of human religious experience, the similarities among all major religions and the vast differences between them.  It will offer a look into the varying and unique perspectives that differing societies and cultures have about the physical world, the spiritual world, and their relationship to each other.  Lastly, it will explore the psychological, social and moral ramifications of such beliefs.  Topics include, but are not limited to, African tribal religions, religions of the ancient Mediterranean area, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism & Taoism, Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity, Islam, Native American spirituality, skepticism and religious relativism.

 


SPECIAL SERVICES

 

The Narragansett Special Education Department offers a variety of programs for those students who have special needs.  Referrals for such services may be initiated by staff members, previous documentation of a student's specific disability, and/or parents.

 

The evaluation process will include a Multi-Disciplinary Team meeting at the building level, with specified recommendations for a formal diagnostic evaluation performed by certified specialists when appropriate.  Consultation with parents, students, teachers, guidance counselors, and administrators is inherent in the evaluation process.

 

Special Education services include, but are not limited to, the following:


·        Adaptive Physical Education

·        Options Planning Center

·        Resource Programs

·        Special Education specialists and                            aides

·        Self-contained classes


·        Speech, Hearing and Language

                   Pathologist

·        School Psychologist

·        School Social Worker

·        School-to-Career


 

The Special Services staff offers courses to those students who have been recommended by their Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) meetings for inclusion in the program.  Placement in courses in the Special Services Department is done in cooperation with the guidance counselor, the special education teachers, and Director of Special Services.  Students do not enroll themselves in these courses.

 

The courses described below are intended to replace required mainstreamed classes.  They provide small group and individualized instruction using a variety of teaching techniques to meet the needs of the students.  Although the content of some of the courses parallels that of the mainstreamed classes, the material is presented at a slower pace, modified texts are used, and the emphasis is on basic concepts.  These courses are not intended to provide direct support for regular class work.  Students may be placed in the Language Arts Skills, Mathematical Skills, and Functional Living Skills courses for up to four years.  Credit toward graduation is awarded for successful completion of each course; however, grades for these courses are not included in determining grade point average (GPA).  Some of these courses may be offered only in alternate years.

 

Special Services Program

The special services program at Narragansett is for students with identified learning difficulties who need extra support in their academic courses.  To qualify for special services, students must go through  the completed referral process, including diagnostic evaluation and have parental consent.

 

School Psychologist

The role of the school psychologist is to provide evaluation, consultation, and counseling services for students having emotional, behavioral, and/or learning difficulties affecting their academic performance and/or school adjustment.  Psychological testing by the school psychologist is one component of a comprehensive assessment to determine whether a student meets the criteria for learning or other disabilities.

 

 

School Social Worker

The school social worker has an essential role in implementing State and Federal regulations for children with disabilities.  Special support is provided to students, families and community in order to help students attain maximum benefit from their school program.  The social worker intervenes in areas related to student's learning opportunities, achievement,  person-social functioning and the need to change interactions of school, student, parent and community.

 

 

Class for the Moderately Handicapped

This class is for students with moderate disabilities  of high school age.  Although it is a self-contained special education class, the students do participate in non-academic classes taught by other high school teachers.  The students have the opportunity to take part in community activities including the Special  Olympics and a swimming program at the Y.M.C.A.  All students participate in a job experience program  with out-of-school placement.

 

 

Speech and Language Therapy

Communication Skills is a course offered through the Special Education Department.  Students are admitted into the course on a need basis determined by the multi-disciplinary team's psychological, educational and speech/language professionals. Course content concentrates on enhancing specific diagnosed deficit areas in speech (articulation, fluency, voice) and language (comprehension, expression, memory and auditory perceptual skills).  The course is available to eligible students in grades 9-12.

 

 

Speech and Language Pathology

The speech language pathologist's, (SLP) population includes pre-K through grade 12.  Children suspected of having speech, language and/or hearing problems are evaluated.  The SLP is also responsible for development and implementation of remedial services for such problems.

 

The caseload includes: children with social/emotional behavioral disorders, moderate disabilities,  hearing impairment,  learning disabilities,  language and speech disorders.  Problems of fluency and voice are also addressed.  The pathologist provides consultation services to teachers, parents and associated health care agencies in the community.

 

 

Physical Therapy

The physical therapist provides therapy in the areas of gross motor skills and coordination for students with disabilities.  This consultant is currently providing therapy two (2) days a week.  The therapist consults with the physical education teachers to insure appropriate goals and objectives in adaptive PE on an as needed basis.

 

 

Occupational Therapy

The occupational therapist provides therapy in fine motor development and sensory integration for students with fine motor disabilities.  Services are provided on an as needed basis to both the student and the classroom teacher.

 

 

 

 

Options Planning Center

A behavior specialist was hired through a grant to meet the diverse educational needs of Narragansett High School students with behavioral needs. The population serviced includes behaviorally disordered and at-risk students.  Students must be previously identified through a special-services process.  The program has been initially developed to provide placement for those students returning from out-of-district programs.  The program will offer a more intense emotional support base for many students in need of assistance and increase the number of options for servicing these students.  This program will hopefully provide an alternative to, not necessarily replace out-of-district placements.  The continuum of services provided is based primarily on cognitive-behavioral and reality therapy principles.  Intensity and pervasiveness determine higher level programming.  The atmosphere of the room is similar to that of a living room, which presents a non-threatening, more relaxed climate where a student can go for a cool-down period, ultimately resulting in a de-escalation of behaviors as well as time for processing with a teacher or therapist.  Each student accessing services has his/her own individual behavior plan that is developed by a team.

 

Resource Support

This class offers academic support to eligible students according to their Individual Educational Plan.  The Resource classes are individualized according to students' academic and perceptual strengths and weaknesses.  The Resource teachers work closely with all the students' academic teachers and reinforcement tactics as needed within the classroom situations.

 

School-to-Career

The “School to Career” program is designed to provide educational training opportunities that enable students to receive (through Education/Business partnerships) appropriate programming to meet their educational needs.  The Program targets students requiring course credit (school day internships) and students requiring career exploration opportunities.  The program has been developed to provide the services and support of a STC Specialist and a STC Job Coach/Instructional Assistant.  This course provides instruction to the majority of students enrolled in the school to career program.  Curriculum is individualized to meet the academic, job, living and community needs of students.  A self-assessment, mastery-learning model is incorporated.  It is a program goal that the School to Career Transition Program, in cooperation with local businesses, will better ensure post-secondary employment opportunities.  Benefits to the cooperative/participating businesses include tax benefits to employers, insurance coverage to student employees, and transportation for students to their place of employment.


INDEX

 

Advanced Placement Courses................................................................................................ 5

Audit Courses..................................................................................................................... 14

Career/College Resource Center............................................................................................ 8

Chariho Vocational Technical Education............................................................................... 16

College Admissions Requirements ....................................................................................... 15

College Courses.................................................................................................................. 14

Concurrent Enrollment......................................................................................................... 15

Course Changes.................................................................................................................... 7

Course Offerings................................................................................................................. 18

Course Selection Procedures.............................................................................................. 6-7

Early Admission to College.................................................................................................. 14

Early Graduation.................................................................................................................. 14

Foreword.............................................................................................................................. 1

Freshmen Course Offerings.................................................................................................... 9

General Information............................................................................................................ 4-5

Graduation Requirements....................................................................................................... 4

Honoring Course Selections................................................................................................... 6

Independent Study Program................................................................................................. 13

Junior Course Offerings....................................................................................................... 11

Level of Difficulty................................................................................................................... 5

New Student Information....................................................................................................... 4

Preparing Your Program........................................................................................................ 6

Program Planning Information............................................................................................. 6-7

Recommended Study Plans.............................................................................................. 8-12

Repeat Courses..................................................................................................................... 5

Senior Course Offerings....................................................................................................... 12

Service Learning Program.................................................................................................... 17

Sophomore Course Offerings............................................................................................... 10

Special Programs........................................................................................................... 13-17

Statement of Purpose......................................................................................................... 2-3

Typical Course Patterns................................................................................................... 8-12

Waiver Process..................................................................................................................... 6

Work Experience Program.................................................................................................. 15

 

ART............................................................................................................................. 19-20

   Art I................................................................................................................................. 19

   Art II................................................................................................................................ 19

   Ceramics I........................................................................................................................ 19

   Ceramics II...................................................................................................................... 20

   Basic Photography............................................................................................................ 19

 

BUSINESS EDUCATION.......................................................................................... 20-21

   Accounting ...................................................................................................................... 20

   Introduction to Financial Services...................................................................................... 20

   Personal Finance......................................................................................................... 20-21

 

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION...................................................................................... 21-22

   CISCO I.......................................................................................................................... 22

   CISCO II......................................................................................................................... 22

   CISCO III....................................................................................................................... 22

   CISCO IV....................................................................................................................... 22

   Computer Applications..................................................................................................... 21

   Computer Hardware, Operating Systems & Networks...................................................... 21

   Elementary Computer Programming.................................................................................. 21

 

ENGLISH.................................................................................................................... 23-29

   Advanced Placement English............................................................................................. 26

   College & Career Communications I................................................................................. 27

   College & Career Communications II................................................................................ 28

   College & Career Communications III.............................................................................. 28

   College & Career Communications IV.............................................................................. 28

   College Writing................................................................................................................. 27

   Contemporary Literature................................................................................................... 26

   English 9 – Level 3........................................................................................................... 23

   English 9 – Level 2........................................................................................................... 23

   English 9 – Accelerated.................................................................................................... 23

   English 10 – Level 3......................................................................................................... 24

   English 10 – Level 2......................................................................................................... 24

   English 10 Accelerated/Humanities.................................................................................... 24

   English 11......................................................................................................................... 24

   English 11 Accelerated..................................................................................................... 25

   English 12......................................................................................................................... 25

   Fantasy Literature............................................................................................................. 26

   Introduction to Theater..................................................................................................... 27

   Rhetoric I......................................................................................................................... 25

   Rhetoric II........................................................................................................................ 26

   Sports Literature............................................................................................................... 29

   Survey of American Literature........................................................................................... 25

   Survey of World Literature............................................................................................... 26

   Theater ............................................................................................................................ 27

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE............................................................................................ 29-30

   French I........................................................................................................................... 29

   French II.......................................................................................................................... 29

   French III......................................................................................................................... 30

   French IV......................................................................................................................... 30

   Italian I............................................................................................................................. 29

   Italian II............................................................................................................................ 29

   Italian III.......................................................................................................................... 30

   Italian IV.......................................................................................................................... 30

   Spanish I.......................................................................................................................... 29

   Spanish II......................................................................................................................... 29

   Spanish III........................................................................................................................ 30

   Spanish IV....................................................................................................................... 30

 

HUMAN SERVICES.................................................................................................. 32-33

   Advanced Foods.............................................................................................................. 32

   Basic Foods..................................................................................................................... 32

   Basic Sewing.................................................................................................................... 33

   Child Development I......................................................................................................... 33

   Child Development II........................................................................................................ 33

   Independent Living........................................................................................................... 33

   Sports Nutrition................................................................................................................ 33

 

MATHEMATICS....................................................................................................... 34-38

   Advanced Placement Calculus.......................................................................................... 36

   Algebra I.......................................................................................................................... 34

   Algebra II......................................................................................................................... 35

   Algebra II Accelerated..................................................................................................... 34

   College Math.................................................................................................................... 35

   Geometry......................................................................................................................... 35

   Geometry Accelerated...................................................................................................... 35

   IMP I............................................................................................................................... 37

   IMP II.............................................................................................................................. 37

   IMP III............................................................................................................................ 38

   IMP IV............................................................................................................................ 38

   Introduction to Calculus I.................................................................................................. 37

   Introduction to Calculus II................................................................................................. 37

   Math 9............................................................................................................................. 34

   Probability & Statistics...................................................................................................... 36

   Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry....................................................................................... 36

   Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry Accelerated................................................................... 36

 

MEDIA/COMMUNICATIONS...................................................................................... 39

   Advanced Video Production............................................................................................. 39

   Film Appreciation............................................................................................................. 39

   Mass Media..................................................................................................................... 39

   Radio/Video Production................................................................................................... 39

 

MUSIC........................................................................................................................ 40-41

   Chorus............................................................................................................................. 40

   Concert Band/Honors Band.............................................................................................. 40

   Guitar I............................................................................................................................. 40

   Guitar II........................................................................................................................... 41

   Music Appreciation.......................................................................................................... 41

   Music Theory................................................................................................................... 41

   Piano I............................................................................................................................. 41

   Piano II............................................................................................................................ 41

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH........................................................................ 42-43

 

 

 

 

SCIENCE.................................................................................................................... 43-47

   Advance Placement Physics.............................................................................................. 47

   Biology I.......................................................................................................................... 45

   Biology I Accelerated....................................................................................................... 45

   Biology II......................................................................................................................... 45

   Biology II Accelerated...................................................................................................... 45

   Chemistry I....................................................................................................................... 46

   Chemistry I Accelerated................................................................................................... 46

   Chemistry II..................................................................................................................... 47

   Earth Science................................................................................................................... 44

   Ecology............................................................................................................................ 46

   Environmental Science...................................................................................................... 46

   Greenhouse & Landscape................................................................................................. 43

   Horticulture I.................................................................................................................... 43

   Horticulture II: Landscape Application.............................................................................. 44

   Horticulture II: Landscape Design..................................................................................... 43

   Horticulture III:  Specialty Plant Production....................................................................... 44

   Horticulture III:  Landscape Construction.......................................................................... 44

   Physics............................................................................................................................. 47

   Physics Accelerated.......................................................................................................... 47

 

SOCIAL STUDIES..................................................................................................... 48-53

   Advanced Placement Psychology...................................................................................... 52

   Advanced Placement United States History....................................................................... 50

   Comparative World Religions........................................................................................... 53

   Contemporary Issues........................................................................................................ 51

   Criminal Justice................................................................................................................. 50

   Ethics............................................................................................................................... 53

   Government/Applied Economics – Level 3........................................................................ 48

   Government/Applied Economics – Level 2........................................................................ 48

   Government/Applied Economics Accelerated.................................................................... 49

   Social & Abnormal Psychology......................................................................................... 52

   Sociology, Socialization, & Psychology............................................................................. 52

   The U.S. and the World.................................................................................................... 51

   United States History – Level 3......................................................................................... 50

   United States History – Level 2......................................................................................... 50

   World History – Level 3................................................................................................... 49

   World History – Level 2................................................................................................... 49

   World History Accelerated/Humanities.............................................................................. 49

   Youth & the Law.............................................................................................................. 51

 

SPECIAL SERVICES................................................................................................. 54-56

   Class for Moderately Handicapped................................................................................... 55

   Occupational Therapy....................................................................................................... 55

   Options Planning Center................................................................................................... 56

   Physical Therapy.............................................................................................................. 55

   Resource Support............................................................................................................. 56

 

 

 

SPECIAL SERVICES (Continued)

   School Psychologist.......................................................................................................... 54

   School Social Worker...................................................................................................... 55

   School-to-Career............................................................................................................. 56

   Special Services Program................................................................................................. 54

   Speech & Language Therapy............................................................................................ 55

   Speech & Language Pathology......................................................................................... 55

 

 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION................................................................................. 30-32

   Architectural Design.......................................................................................................... 31

   Architectural Drafting........................................................................................................ 31

   Construction..................................................................................................................... 31

   Drafting I.......................................................................................................................... 30

   Land Surveying I.............................................................................................................. 32

   Land Surveying II............................................................................................................. 32

   Machine Parts Drafting..................................................................................................... 31

   Technology I.................................................................................................................... 30

   Technology II................................................................................................................... 31