Indirect Kicks
"(2)   Indirect Kick Fouls - For which the other team receives an "indirect free kick" (meaning a goal only counts if another player touches the ball before it enters the goal). The indirect free kick is taken from where the offense occurred. There are 2 types of indirect kick fouls:
a.   Four that apply to all players:
  1. "Dangerous Play" (or playing in a dangerous manner) is any action by a player that in the judgment of the Referee is dangerous to himself or to another player and that isn't a "direct kick foul" such as tripping. Examples would be a high kick when an opponent is nearby, or if a player tries to head a low ball that an opponent is trying to kick, then the player who is putting himself in danger would be guilty of dangerous play. Another example would be any action that might endanger the goalkeeper within the Penalty Box. If the goalkeeper and an opponent both go for a loose ball, the Referee will tend to favor the goalkeeper if there is a collision. It isn't necessary for someone to be hurt for dangerous play to be called. For example, slide tackling with spikes high would be dangerous play, even if the opponent isn't contacted. However, a dangerous act (such as a high kick) isn't "dangerous play" unless an opponent is nearby.
    "Impeding the Progress of an Opponent". Generally, a player cannot use his body to impede another players movements, even if it is not deliberate. This can be called if a player is not within "playing distance" of the ball (i.e., 3 feet) and block's an opponent's movement or screens an opponent from the ball. However, if a player is within playing distance & able to play the ball (meaning not laying on the ground), the player can legally screen an opponent from the ball. (You usually see this when a ball is going out of bounds & the player whose team will get the throw-in screens the opponent so the opponent can't save the ball). Impeding the progress of an opponent used to be called "obstruction". The rule also applies to "innocently" impeding the goalkeeper by standing in front of him when he has the ball.

    Preventing the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his hands. A player who attempts to prevent the Goalkeeper from putting the ball into play by standing directly in front of the Goalkeeper can be called for breaking this rule or for "unsporting behavior", in which case both a Yellow Card & an indirect kick would be awarded.

  2. Any time a yellow or red card is shown & a direct kick isn't awarded (e.g., for "unsporting behavior", "dissent", persistently breaking the rules, and offensive or threatening language)
b.   Four indirect kick fouls that only apply to the goalkeeper & only if committed inside the Penalty Box (the goalkeeper is treated like a regular field player when he is outside the Penalty Box):
  1. Taking more than six seconds while controlling the ball with his hands before releasing it (releasing it can include throwing it, kicking it or dropping it to the ground and then kicking or dribbling it. Once released, it is "live").

    Touching the ball with hands after it is deliberately kicked to the Goalkeeper by a teammate. (Note: It is okay to pick up an accidentally kicked ball or a pass from a teammate that isn't "kicked" but is made using the head, chest, knee, etc.).

    Touching the ball with hands on a throw-in from a teammate (i.e., the goalkeeper can't pick up a throw-in from a teammate).

  2. Intentionally handling the ball again after he has released it and it has not touched any other player (e.g., dropping the ball, dribbling it and then picking it back up). Read b.2 and b.3 above. The Goalkeeper can only handle it again after an opponent touches or if it is accidentally kicked back or if it is headed or chested back by a teammate. He can't pick it up if a teammate has intentionally kicked or thrown it to him" ("Soccer Rules-Rules of Soccer").

Home | Basics of the Game | Rules/Penalties | Positions and Formations | Field | Local teams/Programs | Works Cited | Reflection | Flash

Copyright 2008. This page last modified on Thursday, June 5, 2008 1:10 PM

Send any questions and/or comments to Melissa